THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940’S – 1950’S BED JACKETS

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940'S - 1950'S BED JACKETS

With this photo, I’ve shown most of my true vintage bed jacket collection.  But, as always, you just never know . . . . . . . .

The one on the left is obviously the most unusual, and the oldest (probably 1940’s), but look at the gorgeous lace, ribbons and embroidery, the feminine styles, the soft and flattering  blues of the 1950’s versions.  And, even quilting, for a morning that’s colder. No wonder I love them and do a happy dance when I find another.

All of these were probably owned by women from middle-income families and were part of an average wardrobe – frequently used.  Oh, the charm of it all . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

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MORE GORGEOUS TRUE VINTAGE LINGERIE FROM THE 1940’S & 1950’S

MORE GORGEOUS TRUE VINTAGE LINGERIE FROM THE 1940'S & 1950'S

Exquisite nylon bed jackets, in lovely pinks.  There’s nothing that feels so luxurious as sitting in bed or in a boudoir chair with one of these over your beautiful nightgown while enjoying a cup of tea.

These are so comfortable and pretty, almost any time of year.  As always, the fabric, decoration and details can’t be matched by things sold today.

Sweet dreams! . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MID-CENTURY TRUE VINTAGE SISTER HANDBAGS-MADE IN HONG KONG

Both these little ladies were made in Hong Kong, of similar basic design, but there is a world of difference between them.  Lady Left was made for the uptown market, while Lady Right was sold downtown.  Though they’re both clean and well-put-together, Lady Left grew up with all the best, while Lady Right’s beginnings were more humble.

It’s obvious “in person” that these bags were made for different markets. The styling in both is superior, but the materials and extra attention to detail show that Lady Left brought a higher price.

I don’t have a favorite.  Their stories are equally interesting to me  (maybe Lady Right’s is a little more so . . . . .).  Each one is perfect with the outfit that coordinates with it.  While Lady Right could be much more casual, she is no less elegant – maybe even more so, if you don’t look too closely. Lady Left could seem a little tasteless if she showed up everywhere dressed like that.

I see one for holiday festivities or a very gala occasion (maybe tonight?), while the other would be lovely with a pretty summer dress.  Both would be gorgeous for a bridal venue. It can all be so fascinating . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MORE ABUNDANCE – LOVELY LINGERIE WITH SURPRISING COLORS, DETAILS AND TAILORING

I have found lots of lingerie slips lately but haven’t published them because, though beautiful, they were not the most interesting or fine examples of vintage underclothes.  In this case, you should see these pretty features.

Pretty pastels are always a favorite.  Bright pastels, red and black are major favorites but I don’t think I have ever seen a mid-century nylon slip in royal purple!!!!!!!!!  Maybe the previous owner dyed it to match a favorite dress?. . . . . . . Could have been, (nylon takes dye really well) but NO – the maker’s tag is attached as originally, with no evidence of exposure to fabric dye.

In the second close-up photo of the pale pink half-slip shows a beautiful applied design on the center front.  I LOVE these, and don’t find them often anymore.  Details done on lingerie up to the early 1960’s was often absolutely gorgeous.

Finally, on the oldest piece in this photo I’ve pictured the seaming detail that carefully shapes the bodice.  Most items sold today are almost a one-size-fits-all construction, within a broad category such as S, M or L and don’t fit really well.  This sacrifices a lot of their purpose (after all, these are supposed to be FOUNDATION GARMENTS which used to be designed to give support to and accentuate the fit of the clothing worn on top).

So, that’s a little session about the neat features of true vintage lingerie slips.  I’m always on the look-out for them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MIXING IT UP A BIT – HERE’S A NEW FIND THAT WOULD GO WONDERFULLY UNDER THE RED DRESS OF A FEW DAYS AGO . . . .

A gorgeous 1950’s nylon full slip by Dorsay.  Such beautiful lingerie!  The workmanship and materials can’t be rivaled by modern versions.

Just look at the tiny pleats on the bodice and embroidery at the hem – plus lace, etc. and wider straps.  the heavy fee of the nylon fabric is a delight, too.  I’m sad that it’s too big for me, but I have many lovely others and, I’m sure, more on the way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MORE TREASURE – PRETTY MID-CENTURY (1960’S & 1950’S) NIGHTGOWNS

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Whenever I encounter beautiful examples of sleepwear lingerie from this era, I always bring them home.  Although I love the pj’s, knee-length gowns are another favorite. While made of the same type of wonderful nylon, the gowns usually have more elaborate and prettier decoration.

The Fifties saw mostly pastel pieces similar to the one on right, though sometimes in red or black.  During the Sixties bright colors were popular, as on the left.  This was kind of backward to how lingerie slips were made – go figure.

Anyway, there was no debate or stopping-to-think-about-it for me, but always nice to know all about it . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

SURPRISE FIND TODAY – SHIMMY SHAKE FLAPPER STYLE FROCK FROM THE SIXTIES

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If you can shimmy like your sister Sue, this is the dress for you!  It’s my size, but I have to learn how to do it justice on the dance floor.  However, it’ll probably make a statement with any kind of dance, excepting ballroom.

Someone made this frock or costume by hand in the 1960’s or 1970’s.  Definitely styled to make an impression.  If you’ve ever seen someone who can shimmy well, you know what I mean.

What fun!  I found another 1960’s version earlier this year – a trend?  Who knows.  They say that things come in threes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM