JUST FOUND! GORGEOUS 1930’S – 1940’S WARTIME TO POST-WAR RAYON BED JACKET

 

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What a neat discovery!  I have 2 or 3 lingerie bed jackets from this era already, but haven’t found another for a long time.  Rare, rare, rare.  This one may have been part of some woman’s trousseau, which she stored away lovingly for decades.  Some were made of silk.  This one is glossy rayon.

Pretty bed jackets from the post-war 1950’s are also fabulous, but much different from the older wartime ones.  Notice in the detail close-up the embroidered mesh decoration.  Remember that from the nightgown I showed just a few days ago?

Oh, I’m over the moon again and will also store this garment away lovingly, probably for decades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

OPENING ANOTHER JACKPOT! HERE S A 1940’S – 1950’S SHIRTWAIST DAY DRESS WITH GREAT DETAILS

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How neat!  Classic mid-century styling by Renee Originals with excellent tailoring and hardly any sign of wear.  I just love old frocks that testify to the way that women used to value and preserve their clothing; especially the favorites!

The fabric may be a cotton/rayon blend.  It’s of a medium weight and printed in a checkerboard floral pattern – fall-ish colors with asters or Gerber daisies.  The buttons are black, faceted to look like jet, and there is ric-rac trim on the bodice and skirt.

I’m in love!  Of course, this is an Autumn to Winter dress although temperatures this year would let me wear it now.  I think I’ll save it for the season.  You’ll probably see it, along with other recent finds, modeled properly by one of the working “girls” whenever I get back to Headquarters.  We’re on a roll here, so stay tuned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

NEW FIND – DEPRESSION ERA HANKIE WITH BEAUTIFUL HAND-MADE APPLIQUE’

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I still come across true vintage handkerchiefs once in a while and always collect them.  This one is not fine linen or even high quality cotton and started it’s life as a commercially-made piece that probably had no decoration excepting the machine-done edging, BUT the delicate applique needlework down in the left-lower corner is the real story.  Some woman who couldn’t afford more expensive linens made a dainty item with her own hands.  It is almost unbelievable with the tiny, tiny stitches and the steps taken to prepare the pieces that were sewn on to make the flower.

Girls used to be taught this kind of hand work in almost every home before WWII time, and many still afterwards.  If not lace-making, tatting or applique’ by the late mid-century, girls at least learned some embroidery, crochet or knitting.  My own grandmothers still knew how to do it.

Even though paper tissues are more convenient now, a fabric handkerchief is very elegant and just the thing when attending a wedding or other private affair.  The decoration on most of them is gorgeous, whether hand-done or by machine.  Even the printed patterns are lovely or at least colorful and amusing.  If you’re into home sewing, I’ve seen these hankies pieced together and turned into pretty pillow tops, table linens and even blouses, skirts or dresses.

So, another little story unfolds for me to share with you. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940’S – 1950’S BED JACKETS

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940'S - 1950'S BED JACKETS

With this photo, I’ve shown most of my true vintage bed jacket collection.  But, as always, you just never know . . . . . . . .

The one on the left is obviously the most unusual, and the oldest (probably 1940’s), but look at the gorgeous lace, ribbons and embroidery, the feminine styles, the soft and flattering  blues of the 1950’s versions.  And, even quilting, for a morning that’s colder. No wonder I love them and do a happy dance when I find another.

All of these were probably owned by women from middle-income families and were part of an average wardrobe – frequently used.  Oh, the charm of it all . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MORE GORGEOUS TRUE VINTAGE LINGERIE FROM THE 1940’S & 1950’S

MORE GORGEOUS TRUE VINTAGE LINGERIE FROM THE 1940'S & 1950'S

Exquisite nylon bed jackets, in lovely pinks.  There’s nothing that feels so luxurious as sitting in bed or in a boudoir chair with one of these over your beautiful nightgown while enjoying a cup of tea.

These are so comfortable and pretty, almost any time of year.  As always, the fabric, decoration and details can’t be matched by things sold today.

Sweet dreams! . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MID-CENTURY TRUE VINTAGE SISTER HANDBAGS-MADE IN HONG KONG

Both these little ladies were made in Hong Kong, of similar basic design, but there is a world of difference between them.  Lady Left was made for the uptown market, while Lady Right was sold downtown.  Though they’re both clean and well-put-together, Lady Left grew up with all the best, while Lady Right’s beginnings were more humble.

It’s obvious “in person” that these bags were made for different markets. The styling in both is superior, but the materials and extra attention to detail show that Lady Left brought a higher price.

I don’t have a favorite.  Their stories are equally interesting to me  (maybe Lady Right’s is a little more so . . . . .).  Each one is perfect with the outfit that coordinates with it.  While Lady Right could be much more casual, she is no less elegant – maybe even more so, if you don’t look too closely. Lady Left could seem a little tasteless if she showed up everywhere dressed like that.

I see one for holiday festivities or a very gala occasion (maybe tonight?), while the other would be lovely with a pretty summer dress.  Both would be gorgeous for a bridal venue. It can all be so fascinating . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MORE ABUNDANCE – LOVELY LINGERIE WITH SURPRISING COLORS, DETAILS AND TAILORING

I have found lots of lingerie slips lately but haven’t published them because, though beautiful, they were not the most interesting or fine examples of vintage underclothes.  In this case, you should see these pretty features.

Pretty pastels are always a favorite.  Bright pastels, red and black are major favorites but I don’t think I have ever seen a mid-century nylon slip in royal purple!!!!!!!!!  Maybe the previous owner dyed it to match a favorite dress?. . . . . . . Could have been, (nylon takes dye really well) but NO – the maker’s tag is attached as originally, with no evidence of exposure to fabric dye.

In the second close-up photo of the pale pink half-slip shows a beautiful applied design on the center front.  I LOVE these, and don’t find them often anymore.  Details done on lingerie up to the early 1960’s was often absolutely gorgeous.

Finally, on the oldest piece in this photo I’ve pictured the seaming detail that carefully shapes the bodice.  Most items sold today are almost a one-size-fits-all construction, within a broad category such as S, M or L and don’t fit really well.  This sacrifices a lot of their purpose (after all, these are supposed to be FOUNDATION GARMENTS which used to be designed to give support to and accentuate the fit of the clothing worn on top).

So, that’s a little session about the neat features of true vintage lingerie slips.  I’m always on the look-out for them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM