A HOME-MADE HAND-MADE 1950’S NOVELTY KITCHEN APRON

What a great find! Not too many like this one left and it’s a real gem. The apron’s been sewn together of cotton fabric with our ’50’s housewife embroidered on. She has a cotton print pouf dress with a lace collar, pearl necklace and earring. In one hand she holds a coffeepot and in the other a cup, which doubles as the obligatory little pocket for a hankie or small tool.

Finding something so unique and whimsical is a real treat. And, to think that it was made for fun 60 or more years ago is a bonus. So much better than anything modern, no matter how cute.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG: MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

SO EXCITING. A RARE, ANTIQUE, HANDMADE DRESS FROM THE 1920’S – EARLY 1930’S

Sheer cotton “lawn”(?) – I don’t know.  A beige color with delicate flower and leaf embroidery on the collar and skirt.  Closes with snaps, hooks & eyes on the left and has partially-gathered sleeves and a two-tier skirt.  Such interesting design details, so different from any styles we usually see, vintage or not.

So delicate.  This will be worn with great care.  The waist isn’t right for most dresses made in the 1920’s so it could, possibly, have been an earlier style made for a teen or someone who was very petite.  But – early 1930’s could be the most accurate.  Must do some more in-depth research.

Anyway, what a treasure!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MADE FOR A BOND GIRL? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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The most interesting dress – by Lawrence Kazar  New York and it looks like a “daring” mid-’60’s design to me, but may be 1980’s as I can’t find any earlier history on this designer.  The fit is slinky and small but the armholes are cut very low and it’s styled to wear without a bra.  That’s a trick to do effectively but this design succeeds.  If your dimensions are right, it’s a knockout!!

Besides the bra-less top, the most distinctive feature is the peek-a-boo waistline which was sometimes seen around 1965 or so.  It’s very nicely tailored and such a gorgeous color.  So, Mod or Dynasty, I really couldn’t care less.  Oh, James . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

JUST FOUND! BEAUTIFULLY – TAILORED 1960’S GOWN WITH GORGEOUS DETAIL

What a stunning dress in linen white with old ivory lace sleeves and applique’ decoration.   A little bit Mod and a little bit ethnic.  LOVE the hourglass fit and the button and loop closures all the way down the back.  It looks summery, but the weight of the fabric and full lining lets you do 3 seasons with it.  Extremely well-tailored by Alfred Angelo.   Could go to a formal dance or a wedding.

True, I’ve not been on the prowl a lot lately – been involved in other business and maintaining my inconspicuous profile.  However, this time I just couldn’t resist.  So keep an eye out, because you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

JUST FOUND! GORGEOUS 1930’S – 1940’S WARTIME TO POST-WAR RAYON BED JACKET

 

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What a neat discovery!  I have 2 or 3 lingerie bed jackets from this era already, but haven’t found another for a long time.  Rare, rare, rare.  This one may have been part of some woman’s trousseau, which she stored away lovingly for decades.  Some were made of silk.  This one is glossy rayon.

Pretty bed jackets from the post-war 1950’s are also fabulous, but much different from the older wartime ones.  Notice in the detail close-up the embroidered mesh decoration.  Remember that from the nightgown I showed just a few days ago?

Oh, I’m over the moon again and will also store this garment away lovingly, probably for decades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

NEW FIND – DEPRESSION ERA HANKIE WITH BEAUTIFUL HAND-MADE APPLIQUE’

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I still come across true vintage handkerchiefs once in a while and always collect them.  This one is not fine linen or even high quality cotton and started it’s life as a commercially-made piece that probably had no decoration excepting the machine-done edging, BUT the delicate applique needlework down in the left-lower corner is the real story.  Some woman who couldn’t afford more expensive linens made a dainty item with her own hands.  It is almost unbelievable with the tiny, tiny stitches and the steps taken to prepare the pieces that were sewn on to make the flower.

Girls used to be taught this kind of hand work in almost every home before WWII time, and many still afterwards.  If not lace-making, tatting or applique’ by the late mid-century, girls at least learned some embroidery, crochet or knitting.  My own grandmothers still knew how to do it.

Even though paper tissues are more convenient now, a fabric handkerchief is very elegant and just the thing when attending a wedding or other private affair.  The decoration on most of them is gorgeous, whether hand-done or by machine.  Even the printed patterns are lovely or at least colorful and amusing.  If you’re into home sewing, I’ve seen these hankies pieced together and turned into pretty pillow tops, table linens and even blouses, skirts or dresses.

So, another little story unfolds for me to share with you. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940’S – 1950’S BED JACKETS

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940'S - 1950'S BED JACKETS

With this photo, I’ve shown most of my true vintage bed jacket collection.  But, as always, you just never know . . . . . . . .

The one on the left is obviously the most unusual, and the oldest (probably 1940’s), but look at the gorgeous lace, ribbons and embroidery, the feminine styles, the soft and flattering  blues of the 1950’s versions.  And, even quilting, for a morning that’s colder. No wonder I love them and do a happy dance when I find another.

All of these were probably owned by women from middle-income families and were part of an average wardrobe – frequently used.  Oh, the charm of it all . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM