ONE OF MY FAVORITE FORTIES FROCK FINDS

IMG_1274  I just LOVE this so much.  Look at that fabulous, huge velvet bow, the pretty scalloped neckline and the pleated panel in front.  Makes me feel exactly like I’m back in an old movie.

Shoulder pads, of course, and a side zipper.  This was an elegant dress for dinner or some special occasion.  In black crepe – the classic never-fail fabric for flattering fine frocks – whether formal or simply dressy.

Beautifully made, of course, though not a designer piece.  Didn’t matter back in the day, because the quality scale was so much higher.  I found another 1940’s dress at the same time which is a semi-exception to this rule and very surprising because of that.  But, then, it was wartime and social factors sometimes caused a major disruption in ladies fashion . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

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MOD, MOD, MOD! A TRUE VINTAGE THREE-SEASON 1960’S FROCK

IMG_1052 This dress is at least 30 years old, and I can’t tell much more about it than that right now.  The colors are VERY mid-sixties Mod and I LOVE what the designer has done with the black and white trim.

It’s also a nice kind of older rayon blend that hangs so well and shows off with a little sheen.  And, it has a flattering cut and nice tailoring, too.

A bit of a mystery, but a choice garment . .. . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

SHEER 1950’S PARTY DRESS AND SILK SLIP

IMG_1149IMG_1147IMG_1150IMG_1148These pieces were found on opposite sides of the world, several years apart, but they work here.  Mid-century sheer dresses require beautiful, but pretty plain, lingerie slips of the right length to carry them off properly.

From Canada, the lovely peach-colored silk slip can double as a dress.  Bias cut and the slinky, sexy fit points to the 1930’s as it’s era.  Pretty embroidery makes it really special and it has little hardware which make the shoulder straps adjustable..

The sheer party dress, which I found in Australia a few years ago, was probably custom-tailored.  Dropped waist and tea length.  See the photo showing metallic piping that is sewn around each sleeve and the front of the neckline, with a cowl in back. The fabric also has metallic flower and leaf decoration stamped on.  So fabulous to find pieces like this in near-perfect condition!

Picky work to construct this dress, and I’m so astounded by the skill of seamstresses back in the day.  Yes, it was a lot of work, but how fun it would be to have something exactly as you wanted with personalized fit!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

AUSTRALIAN TRUE VINTAGE SPECIAL OCCASION DRESS IN SILK – 1950’S (OR BEFORE)

IMG_1056     This very pretty frock has an unusual neckline.  The collar is of 3 layers, and each one is bordered by covered wiring which allows the wearer to shape the neckline as desired.  A friend of mine said that she remembers dresses of this type from the 1950’s.  The style would certainly fit in with early ’50’s and late 1940’s fashion.

It’s also very tiny, so it all points to a time when average women’s figures and clothing sizes were much smaller than they are today.

The fabric appears to be silk.  So lovely and flattering.  Obviously, this dress was made to be worn to a party or other special occasion.  Imagine my delight when I discovered it!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

ANOTHER GREAT DISCOVERY! FABULOUS FIFTIES FROCK WITH FUR TRIMMING

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CUSTOM-TAILORED 1950’S PARTY FROCK WITH RABBIT TRIM

Although this dress looks very cute on Stella’s figure, it really must have been sewn for a petite woman much shorter.  I can’t quite imagine a style like this with fur and rhinestone trim made for a teen or a child in the 1950’s.  At any rate, the average height of a Fifties lady would have been 5 or 6 inches shorter while still perhaps being a tiny vintage size 10, like Stella.

Imagine my surprise to see this rare garment!  If you’ve been with me for a while, you may remember that several years ago I encountered a similar frock in ivory brocade with mink trim on the 3/4 sleeves.  That seems to have been a popular early 1950’s trend. In this case, we are seeing very pretty rabbit fur, with a little rhinestone trim nestled in the bodice ornament.

Another surprise is that this frock, despite it’s elegant style and up-scale materials, appears to have been hand-made.  It’s construction demonstrates the handiwork of someone who was very skilled, so perhaps it was made by a professional tailor rather than a home-based seamstress.  However, who actually knows?  With no labels to point the way, it’s just another delicious mystery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

SURPRISE FIND TODAY – SHIMMY SHAKE FLAPPER STYLE FROCK FROM THE SIXTIES

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If you can shimmy like your sister Sue, this is the dress for you!  It’s my size, but I have to learn how to do it justice on the dance floor.  However, it’ll probably make a statement with any kind of dance, excepting ballroom.

Someone made this frock or costume by hand in the 1960’s or 1970’s.  Definitely styled to make an impression.  If you’ve ever seen someone who can shimmy well, you know what I mean.

What fun!  I found another 1960’s version earlier this year – a trend?  Who knows.  They say that things come in threes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

FIFTIES FORMAL FROCK & MATCHING (?) FOOTWEAR

IMG_0923 IMG_0973Don’t know if these pieces went together back in the day, but someone probably wore these pale celery green items to a Prom, Homecoming or similar formal dance.  I would also want to add a shawl or bolero jacket.

The shoes are covered in satin and it was so great to find them in such excellent condition!  That’s some of the best fun of coming across a find like this.

If it had been up to me, I’d move the bow from the front of the dress to the waist – maybe in back.  But, that’s a project for another day. . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM