FABULOUS FIND! EARLY 1950’S 2-PC SWEATER DRESS – VA-VA-VOOM!!

IMG_4205

What a wiggle dress this is!  Marilyn Monroe – move over!!  What a rare find – couldn’t believe it when it appeared (no, I fib. Of course I could).  It’s hand-knitted, as was the one given to me several years ago by my friend Rosalie, who had made it herself in 1952.  Likely, many women who were competent needle-workers did so when this style was popular.

This example is made.of glossy yarn just perfect for a sophisticated occasion. I’m keeping it for wearing at just the right vintage venues (local museum events come to mind) or theme cocktail parties, Halloween  . . . . . . . . ..

Anyway, I’ll be having LOTS of fun with it and other great pieces that were discovered this winter.  That’s what it’s all about!!!  Too much enthusiasm?  Never . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE NIGHTGOWNS – 1940’S TO 1950’S

TRUE VINTAGE NIGHTGOWNS - 1940'S TO 1950'S

More things that I love about colder weather – it’s a time when we feel like wearing something a little heavier at night (or just wearing something, period).  Here are 3 beautiful nylon gowns with applique’, embroidery, bows, lace and gathers.

Back when it was a pleasure to get dressed!  The longest is from the ’40’s, I believe, or the very early ’50’s.  Nylon was rationed during wartime,  so that would put it into the late ’40’s at the earliest.

The two shorter gowns would be from the ’50’s and show a little more decoration – when items were more lavish after the Forties, and hemlines higher.

Like ’50’s lingerie, you can’t beat the nightgowns of that time for feminine detail and, sometimes, over-the-top frills!  On the other hand, early ’30’s and  ’40’s silk gowns are to die for.  We’ll see some of that, too.

Dressing for day or dressing for bed – could be an adventure in itself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

TRUE VINTAGE 1950’S COCKTAIL SHEATH DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE 1950'S COCKTAIL SHEATH DRESS

While we’re in a New Year mood, here’s a really special dress from, I believe, the 1950’s. It’s more or less a cocktail style, but could go to dinner and dancing, too.

Originally, it had nude netting on the front bodice and upper back, with skinny binding around the armhole area and the neckline.  The purpose is to give a bare look, without the bare.

Very elegant but, unfortunately, the material had some small holes which could not be repaired. I could not locate material of the same type for a replacement, so I reluctantly removed it and restyled things a bit to make skinny straps instead. It works! Being versatile is an indispensable skill.

I love this dramatic pointy accent on the front! The fabric is also very elegant – probably a rayon that looks for all the world like silk shantung. And the hourglass shape!

Worthy of Peggy Lee any day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MORE ABUNDANCE – LOVELY LINGERIE WITH SURPRISING COLORS, DETAILS AND TAILORING

I have found lots of lingerie slips lately but haven’t published them because, though beautiful, they were not the most interesting or fine examples of vintage underclothes.  In this case, you should see these pretty features.

Pretty pastels are always a favorite.  Bright pastels, red and black are major favorites but I don’t think I have ever seen a mid-century nylon slip in royal purple!!!!!!!!!  Maybe the previous owner dyed it to match a favorite dress?. . . . . . . Could have been, (nylon takes dye really well) but NO – the maker’s tag is attached as originally, with no evidence of exposure to fabric dye.

In the second close-up photo of the pale pink half-slip shows a beautiful applied design on the center front.  I LOVE these, and don’t find them often anymore.  Details done on lingerie up to the early 1960’s was often absolutely gorgeous.

Finally, on the oldest piece in this photo I’ve pictured the seaming detail that carefully shapes the bodice.  Most items sold today are almost a one-size-fits-all construction, within a broad category such as S, M or L and don’t fit really well.  This sacrifices a lot of their purpose (after all, these are supposed to be FOUNDATION GARMENTS which used to be designed to give support to and accentuate the fit of the clothing worn on top).

So, that’s a little session about the neat features of true vintage lingerie slips.  I’m always on the look-out for them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

THE FIRST OF TWO FABULOUS MID-CENTURY FINDS – NEW LOOK CUSTOM-TAILORED BALL GOWN

This gown is hand-tailored with extreme attention to detail.  It would be worn with a crinoline for a full, bell-shape.  Because of the styling, I would guess that it was made in the early 1950’s but, possibly, as early as the late 1940’s.  A special occasion dress, of course, and there’s hardly any evidence of wear.  Maybe it was even made for a Prom or Homecoming dance back in the day.

Women were so happy to dress in longer skirts, sumptuous fabrics and new styles after the austerity of the war years.

I’ll be showing a sister gown tomorrow – very similar style and probably made a few years earlier.  What fabulous discoveries!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE 1940s – ’50s LIGHTWEIGHT KNIT SWEATER OR BLOUSE

TRUE VINTAGE 1940s - '50s LIGHTWEIGHT KNIT SWEATER OR BLOUSE

Lovely nylon knit sweater-blouse in soft green. Perfect for making a transition to the cold weather. By Canterbury – a company which was known for beautiful cardigans, too. What’s the special magic about this one?

Look at the fit.  The knit drapes so nicely and it is full-fashioned, which always improves the way that a sweater fits the body.  At the neckline there are many tiny vintage shell buttons – the kind that are substantial and well-shaped, even though they are very small. They do allow you to close the neckline, if desired, but are mostly for decoration.

As long as you protect it from snags and stains, an item like this is very easy to care for. Hand washing (or delicate in a newer machine) is best, with similar colors.  This avoids stretching and, also, protects the color.  Nylon can absorb other colors in the wash so it’s always best to wash it alone or to avoid washing it with contrasting shades.  If you want to change the color of a nylon item, they accept dye very well.  Just be sure to follow the directions very carefully because they may end up streaky if you don’t.

With any kind of pants or a pencil, a-line or pleated skirt (depending on your figure) it looks wonderful.  This is how it was worn back in the day. Put a scarf at the neck, or pearls.  Perfect for every-day or dressed up – clothing of this quality is always elegant.

I found this at a small vintage shop, on the sale rack. I usually find the best things in unlikely places and at unheard of prices! I wonder who wore this one and where? You just never know . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

A TIMELESS FIND FROM “DOWN UNDER” – TRUE VINTAGE CLASSIC WHITE BLOUSE

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA     This shirt joined my true vintage wardrobe when I was in Australia several years ago.  It’s of the most wonderful cotton/cotton-blend fabric! That was my first tip-off to its age.  I have another white blouse from the Forties with similar tailoring details, but this one is not quite so old.  Although it’s a timeless style, the little clues that it isn’t modern are all over.

With no label, its origin is a mystery.  It looks as though it was commercially-made, but not completely.  Sometimes custom-made garments from tailoring shops had that look.

Although the answers are elusive, it’s different and I know it.  Imagine my delight to discover this hiding among all the ho-hum modern things . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM