PRETTY 1960’S SPRING INTO SUMMER DRESS ENSEMBLES OUR GRANDMOTHERS KNIT AT HOME

IMG_1482Ready for a big project?  These patterns from a true vintage McCall’s needlework magazine from 1962 are just what you need!

Aren’t they elegant and very lovely?  A handmade ensemble like this would be totally unique today.

When everyone tended to dress up a little more and women almost always wore dresses  or skirts, it was easy to glide from more casual activities to something more dressy without having to change an entire outfit.  Add a matching jacket or coat,  maybe change your shoes and accessories, comb your hair and touch up make-up et voila’ . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

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TRUE VINTAGE 1970’S ELEGANT DINNER-DANCE-DATE DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE 1970S ELEGANT DINNER-DANCE-DATE DRESS

It seems to me that nothing from the 1970’s could be as wonderful as a beautifully made dress from the 1920’s, 1930’s, 1940’s or 1950’s, but I still like some of the ones made during the Seventies.  These crystal pleats in the skirt started in the 1940’s, I think, and are always great.

For a more relaxed time while you still want to look well-dressed, elegant but comfortable this is a good choice.  It’s still cool enough in many parts of the world to wear this dress.  It would be very nice for a dinner date and, like some others I’ve shown, excellent for dancing because of the ease of movement.

Although it’s made of the ever-present 1970’s polyester, the fabric is lightweight and hangs well.  I love the pleats in the skirt for that reason.  That’s one nice thing about polyester, no matter what decade it’s from – it holds its shape and travels really well.

The colors in this dress are fresh for Spring, but would carry you through any time of year if the weather permits.  Very versatile and also figure – enhancing because of the cut.  It’s another of those vintage styles which intrigues by draping over and moving with your shape, but not too much.  Bateau necklines are always a favorite of mine, too.

With a skinny belt and very simple jewelry, this one is a winner and worth the investment.  I always like getting big dividends from small investments. . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

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NEW TO ME – PRETTY PASTEL YELLOW CLASSIC 1960’S FROCK

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Very early Sixties Spring dress from the early to mid-1960’s.  It’s a real blast from the past in a lady-like style, so typical of that time.  The zipper is metal, but the fabric an easy-care knit which was also popular then – “wash and wear” had become the common thing.

A dress like this is so versatile.  It can be worn almost everywhere, dressed up or down. Especially now when footwear choices are completely open, boots, pumps, sandals or flip-flops could all be possibilities that would not have been “right” when this dress was made.  Oh, you might have gotten by with go-go boots, flats, pumps or dressy sandals but that would have been all.

Ahh, fashion freedom.  Love it!  Can’t have it without true vintage in your closet, too . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

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TRUE VINTAGE MID-SIXTIES – 1970’S EMPIRE WAIST SEMI-FORMAL LONG DRESS IN NAVY, WITH MATCHING JACKET

IMG_0981 IMG_0982     So typical between the mid-Sixties and mid-Seventies.  In spite of all the frou-frou Edwardian/Prairie/Hippie stuff that was popular, plain knit dresses with clean lines were also a staple – more elegant and timeless, but still very fashionable.

This ensemble is a polyester or poly blend with an empire seam that rises from waist level up under the bust-line in front, fold-over neckline, back zip and a princess cut.  The long-sleeve bolero jacket echos the military trend that was also popular then with it’s metal buttons.

Otherwise, the design is  plain and undecorated.  The fabric has a slight ribbed texture to add interest.  It’s hard to call this dress “semi-formal” because it is so tailored, but at that time the style would not have been a day-dress.

Especially good for Spring or Fall.  What a treat!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

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TRUE VINTAGE 1940s – ’50s LIGHTWEIGHT KNIT SWEATER OR BLOUSE

TRUE VINTAGE 1940s - '50s LIGHTWEIGHT KNIT SWEATER OR BLOUSE

Lovely nylon knit sweater-blouse in soft green. Perfect for making a transition to the cold weather. By Canterbury – a company which was known for beautiful cardigans, too. What’s the special magic about this one?

Look at the fit.  The knit drapes so nicely and it is full-fashioned, which always improves the way that a sweater fits the body.  At the neckline there are many tiny vintage shell buttons – the kind that are substantial and well-shaped, even though they are very small. They do allow you to close the neckline, if desired, but are mostly for decoration.

As long as you protect it from snags and stains, an item like this is very easy to care for. Hand washing (or delicate in a newer machine) is best, with similar colors.  This avoids stretching and, also, protects the color.  Nylon can absorb other colors in the wash so it’s always best to wash it alone or to avoid washing it with contrasting shades.  If you want to change the color of a nylon item, they accept dye very well.  Just be sure to follow the directions very carefully because they may end up streaky if you don’t.

With any kind of pants or a pencil, a-line or pleated skirt (depending on your figure) it looks wonderful.  This is how it was worn back in the day. Put a scarf at the neck, or pearls.  Perfect for every-day or dressed up – clothing of this quality is always elegant.

I found this at a small vintage shop, on the sale rack. I usually find the best things in unlikely places and at unheard of prices! I wonder who wore this one and where? You just never know . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

A TRUE VINTAGE KNITTED SWEATER CAPE BY BANFF, FROM THE 1960’S OR EARLY ’70’S

A TRUE VINTAGE KNITTED SWEATER CAPE BY BANFF, FROM THE 1960'S OR EARLY '70'S

These types of sweaters/capes/ponchos were popular in the ’60’s and a lot of women knitted them themselves. This one is made by the Banff company, which produced a lot of really nice knits. I have a beaded sweater, knit dresses and suits by them, too.

The greatest feature, to me, is the armholes that allow you to have hands free. Any cape with this design is wonderful because it raises the convenience level big time!

Another nice thing is the button front. Also convenient. The fringe is lovely and the acrylic yarn also great because it washes so nicely and gives warmth but doesn’t have the weight and care issues of most wool items.

Sweet little sweater things, whether cardigans, pull-overs, jackets & coats, dresses and skirts,etc. were really popular in the ’60’s and early ’70’s and are very different from the things made now.

I love finding these beautiful vintage garments that are so unique, stylish and of exceptional quality. This one is an open-weave, so perfect for late Spring, early Fall and cool Summer nights.

True vintage sweater knits are not common finds (are any really common?) but definitely worth the treasure hunt . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

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RARE FIND!! THE SWEETEST LITTLE TRUE VINTAGE BABY JACKET – A MID-CENTURY TREASURE

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SUCH FUN FINDING VINTAGE CHILDREN’S CLOTHING!  THIS COAT WAS HAND-MADE WITH LOVE.

What a gorgeous little sweater-coat!  So well-made.

It’s so unusual to discover baby clothes and toddler’s outfits.  Other than special-occasion garments like christening gowns that are made to wear only once and then folded away as keepsakes, children’s-wear tends to disappear after it’s been through months of dirty diapers, falls and messy meals.

Although this little coat probably wouldn’t have been worn every day, it would have experienced some wear and tear and has been beautifully preserved.  The style and the buttons put it smack-dab in the 1940’s – early 1960’s, when the wool yarn would also have been more common for an infant’s garment than something made since then (too hard to clean when easy-care acrylic yarn is available).  The knitter’s label, however, would have been attached some time in or after the 1960’s – or it could have been made with vintage materials and a vintage pattern at a later time.

Since the blue-for-boys, pink-for-girls thing was pretty rigid until recent years, I feel safe to say that it was made for a little girl.  It’s so intriguing to wonder about the story behind it.  Was it made by a relative or close friend or even purchased at a craft show?  I’ll always wonder – you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

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TRUE VINTAGE LATE 60’S – EARLY ’70’S MINI TRENCH RAINCOAT

TRUE VINTAGE LATE 60’S – EARLY ’70’S MINI TRENCH RAINCOAT.

TRUE VINTAGE MID-CENTURY FALL COATS & JACKETS TO MAKE AT HOME!

IMG_1030 IMG_1048 Need a new coat?  Well, in just a few minutes of your spare time . . . . . . Right!   McCalls Needlework Magazine used to publish patterns for projects like these all year.  In the 1950’s and 1960’s it was so common.

Aren’t they beautiful? – But, can you imagine making one??  Your grandmother might have.  I rarely find a hand-knitted one now, but once in a while . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

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HERE’S THE TRUE VINTAGE SOPHISTICATED SISTER – A LITTLE BLACK DRESS FROM THE 1970’S

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Ditch the mini-length, add a bit of va-voom and some frills et voila! – dinner or cotillion dance-worthy.  Although the comfortable style and flexible double-knit would probably permit it, this is no frock for the bar scene or Stayin’ Alive dance party.

Yes, it was still possible to find garments of quality construction and elegant design in the 1970’s.  Sadly, most of them are gone now because the knit fabrics didn’t make it till today or simply because women had begun to stop taking the care of their clothing which was common in the 1960’s and before.

So much more precious for me to discover two frocks of this type (see yesterday’s post, too).  Both are definitely keepers that I can wear for decades to come . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

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