DRESSY TRUE VINTAGE HAND-KNITTED OR CROCHETED SHAWLS FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES, COTILLIONS, THE OPERA . . . . . . . . .

DRESSY TRUE VINTAGE CROCHETED SHAWLS FOR HOLIDAY PARTIES, COTILLIONS, THE OPERA . . . . . . . . .

Two beautiful hand-crocheted or knitted shawls for party-wear or any festive occasion. In neutral pastel shades with metallic yarn accents.

Items like this were especially popular in the years moving from the 1950’s to the 1960’s. Many women made these garments at home.  Nothing dresses up a little black dress in such a feminine and beguiling way as a needlework accessory.

If you like doing handiwork, look for old pattern and instruction books from the ’50’s and ’60’s.  Although many types of scarves and shawls are sold now, nothing compares to a handmade item in a soft, genuine wool yarn.

And, if you can find a true vintage shawl – go for it!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

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TRUE VINTAGE 1940’s – 1950’s RED VELVETEEN PARTY DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE 1950'S CHRISTMAS RED VELVETEEN PARTY DRESS

Staying in the spirit – looking back on the Christmas Dance (or ahead to the Valentine’s Day Dance)!  I just love this little circle skirt dress from the 1940’s – early 1950’s with sequins on the bodice.

Probably custom-tailored, with little cap sleeves and a skirt meant to swing.   Just right for dancing.

This is one of my favorite colors – good any season, but especially right when everything is white and gray outside.  Velveteen is also such a feel-good fabric.  You can’t beat rayon for drape, but velvet, silk, nylon and poly have their own lovely ways.

Zip up the back, waist-hugging style – there’s nothing too remarkable about the tailoring but it’s unmistakably TRUE VINTAGE, and  only the real thing that has that “look”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

TRUE VINTAGE 1950’S JACQUARD COCKTAIL BLOUSE

TRUE VINTAGE 1950'S JACQUARD COCKTAIL BLOUSE

Here’s a lovely, oh-so-flattering jacquard blouse for cocktails, dinner, dancing and parties. It looks superb with a long black skirt or black cigarette pants.

Notice the little bows at the waist. It also buttons up the back (I LOVE that feature of so many ’50’s blouses) with 5/8″ covered buttons. Very swank.

The fun thing about 50’s separates like this is that they were dressed up or down, since rock and roll, rhythm and blues and, later, cocktail parties became such a rage – on top of the more formal and traditional occasions that were always part of the social scene.

As usual, the cut and tailoring of this piece is outstanding. The fabric is quite nice, too. Just the right thing for a woman of intrigue to have in her closet, no? . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

TRUE VINTAGE 1950’S COCKTAIL SHEATH DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE 1950'S COCKTAIL SHEATH DRESS

While we’re in a New Year mood, here’s a really special dress from, I believe, the 1950’s. It’s more or less a cocktail style, but could go to dinner and dancing, too.

Originally, it had nude netting on the front bodice and upper back, with skinny binding around the armhole area and the neckline.  The purpose is to give a bare look, without the bare.

Very elegant but, unfortunately, the material had some small holes which could not be repaired. I could not locate material of the same type for a replacement, so I reluctantly removed it and restyled things a bit to make skinny straps instead. It works! Being versatile is an indispensable skill.

I love this dramatic pointy accent on the front! The fabric is also very elegant – probably a rayon that looks for all the world like silk shantung. And the hourglass shape!

Worthy of Peggy Lee any day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

GORGEOUS CUSTOM-MADE POST-WAR FORMAL GOWN IN SUMPTUOUS BLACK RAYON VELVET

Although very similar, I might place this dress as having been made a little earlier than the one shown yesterday – looks late 1940’s to me.  It might or might not have been worn with a crinoline underneath.  Like the other, it’s completely hand-made and this one has the tailor’s label sewn into the neckline.

One of the best things about this gown is the fabric – a plush, heavy velvet that feels like old rayon.  Love the sweetheart neckline and off-the-shoulder sleeves that, to my taste, are done a bit more artfully than those on yesterday’s dress.  I think it’s mostly a style change that took place over a couple of years around the turn of the ’40’s to ’50’s decade.

Anyway, who wouldn’t love it!  I so wonder what events these dresses were made for and where they went.  That part of the mystery is as yet unsolved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

 

 

 

A 1980’S GUNNE SAX PARTY DRESS DISCOVERY

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A retro Prairie/Victorian style from designer Jessica McClintock, made in the 1980’s with dark green crushed velvet (so perfect with Stella’s new haircolor) and a lacey bodice.  Fitted styling completes the picture of a feminine design which gives a nod to history.

Gunne Sax early dresses, before the 1990’s, were very interesting and unique.  I always pick one up when I find it – becoming more and more rare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

FABULOUS FIND! FIREY RED TRUE VINTAGE EARLY 1950’S FROCK . . .

IMG_1467 IMG_1468Stella is doing a 1950’s Janet Leigh thing this time (she loves her wigs).  Just perfect in this custom-tailored red velveteen frock with rhinestone buttons and buckle.  It’s a little warm for this time of year – probably best for Christmas or Valentine’s Day – but, how could I resist?

It’s got those little pointy cuffs on the 3/4/ sleeves that are so stylish, and a very full skirt.  No lining or slip needed with this cotton velveteen fabric, as it’s very opaque and will be cuddly in cool weather.

The buttons and belt buckle are very nice, too.  Would be lovely to still have notions like this available at the corner store . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM