FUN 1960’S PRAIRIE FARMER GIRL FROCK

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Fun find today!  A custom-made prairie-girl dress that can go all year round.  Just put a blouse, t-shirt or t-neck underneath and there you go.  The fabric is a woven synthetic of the late-mid-century time so it’s a Sixties take on a much older style.  There are Amish in the area where I discovered it, but I’m not sure this is their style.  May be some other groups who wear slightly less modest clothing and would be allowed to show their arms. ?  It’s got an old metal CC zipper and hardly any wear so, who knows.  The sash ties in back and there’s ric-rac all around.

Just fun, so true vintage and cute!  Another mystery, which I love. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE AMERICAN WOOL JUMPER DRESS FROM THE LATE ’50’S OR EARLY ’60’S

TRUE VINTAGE AMERICAN WOOL JUMPER DRESS FROM THE LATE '50'S OR EARLY '60'S

Here’s a very special woven wool jumper dress with big shell buttons. Although I have it pinned since it’s a little too teeny for Madge, you see how much difference a little change in one’s figure could make in the fit!

It’s really cut for a petite woman, maybe slightly under average height. But, a couple more inches here and there and VAVOOM!  Unfortunately, a shade too much on the petite side for me and no Vavoom, so I sold it before Stella joined me and it would have fitted her well!

Dresses like this were super popular right around 1960 and might have been worn with a turtleneck, but a blouse would have been more likely. I show it with this sweater just because the color matches so well.

The most outstanding feature of this design is the big abalone shell buttons asymmetrically closing the front. And, the hem-line is fairly long, especially on a shorter person. A sign of the times.

Definitely a sophisticated back-to-school or a career dress for some aspiring young woman!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

A FABULOUS TRUE VINTAGE FIND – MOD GEOMETRIC PRINT SIXTIES KNIT TUNIC

A FABULOUS FIND - MOD GEOMETRIC PRINT SIXTIES KNIT TUNIC

I’ll soon be on an investigation again, so a little patience may be needed, please, with my time-table!  Here’s another wonderful find – a mod tunic blouse in a heavy synthetic knit. Similar to the fabric in yesterday’s dress from the Forties, but grown up a generation.

I love the style and the printed design, with long sleeves.  Looks great with long pants, short skirts . . . . . . An excellent choice for cool Spring-ish weather.

This design has a little short zipper at the back neckline and falls mostly straight, with a little shaping in the torso.  As you can see on Madge, the fit is very flattering.

Vintage knits are almost always wonderful, regardless of the type of fabric.  Usually they are heavy and drape well.  That’s what makes them fit so beautifully.  And, of course, the design is on the back, too.  No cutting corners on the best true vintage!

I always love finding unusual pieces like this one. Makes my day . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

INCREDIBLE TRUE VINTAGE DRESSY COCKTAIL SWEATER FROM THE 1950’S – MAYBE EARLY 1960’S

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So much fun!  A pretty open-weave  Orlon sweater knit with metallic thread design to be worn with a black skirt or slacks at some mid-century party event.  It is absolutely amazing that it’s survived for 60 years in almost unworn condition!

Just like the women of the 1940’s onward, I’m grateful for these lovely acrylic yarns that can be washed in a machine (with care) and don’t have to be stored in a moth-proof container.  Orlon was a revelation and major time-saving blessing to wartime and post-war ladies who still did most of their housework by hand.

Although we’re so used to acrylic fibers now, these early ones were really special in terms of their quality or, perhaps, it is the garment itself that is made so well that the fabric looks great after more than half a century.  I’m sure that I also, again, have to thank the first owner of this elegant top for taking such good care of it.

I’m over the full moon again, and wondering what will turn up next . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

RARE ONCE AGAIN – 1950’S – EARLY 1960’S MEN’S KNIT POLO SHIRT

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Just LOVE finding these knitwear items that have been so well-preserved for 50 – 60 years!!  Unusual finds are always tons of fun.

This shirt was made by a Sears, Roebuck & Co. brand that quit producing in the early 1960’s.  Very nicely tailored, with a longer tail (prevents embarrassing views that are all too common today).  Hard-to-see in this photo, but the sleeves are a ribbed knit contrast to the flat knit of the body.

These older things all have features and stories to tell that keep revealing themselves.  The star item of my recent adventures is coming up tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

RARE FIND!! THE SWEETEST LITTLE TRUE VINTAGE BABY JACKET – A MID-CENTURY TREASURE

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SUCH FUN FINDING VINTAGE CHILDREN’S CLOTHING!  THIS COAT WAS HAND-MADE WITH LOVE.

What a gorgeous little sweater-coat!  So well-made.

It’s so unusual to discover baby clothes and toddler’s outfits.  Other than special-occasion garments like christening gowns that are made to wear only once and then folded away as keepsakes, children’s-wear tends to disappear after it’s been through months of dirty diapers, falls and messy meals.

Although this little coat probably wouldn’t have been worn every day, it would have experienced some wear and tear and has been beautifully preserved.  The style and the buttons put it smack-dab in the 1940’s – early 1960’s, when the wool yarn would also have been more common for an infant’s garment than something made since then (too hard to clean when easy-care acrylic yarn is available).  The knitter’s label, however, would have been attached some time in or after the 1960’s – or it could have been made with vintage materials and a vintage pattern at a later time.

Since the blue-for-boys, pink-for-girls thing was pretty rigid until recent years, I feel safe to say that it was made for a little girl.  It’s so intriguing to wonder about the story behind it.  Was it made by a relative or close friend or even purchased at a craft show?  I’ll always wonder – you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TIME TO GET SERIOUS ABOUT THOSE WINTER SWEATERS – MORE MID-CENTURY NEEDLEWORK PATTERNS FROM MCCALLS

IMG_1024 IMG_1020“My gosh – look at the time!   It’s coming up Thanksgiving (in the U.S.) and I must think about winter sweaters – many of them may be Christmas gifts.”   Our grandmothers were likely saying things like this to themselves right about now, if they hadn’t been knitting since last July!

Such cute and sophisticated handmade beauties – no comparison to what’s in the stores (especially now).  Even if your family didn’t take an annual ski-trip to Vail, Colorado or the Swiss Alps, sweaters like these were popular wardrobe items.

If you love old movies and sit-coms, like I do, you’ll see plenty of them along with “stretch pants” and stirrup pants for everyday as well as being ski-wear.  If you can do this kind of needlework, Bravo!   I just have to keep my antennae alert for the real thing . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM