PERFECT POST-WAR SHIRT-DRESS!

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Absolutely couldn’t believe it when I encountered this 1940’s – 1950’s post-WWII frock – looks like it just came out of the box!  Somebody loved it and kept it for special.

Back in the day, this was this was an everyday – Sunday tea kind of dress.  It was very modestly-priced in it’s time but was meant to look nice for not-just-your-ordinary occasion.  My good luck that it’s owner was so fastidious.

It’s a little big for me so, unless I want to have it altered, it will probably end up on eBay some day.  But how could I pass it by?  There’s more . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

NEW FIND – DEPRESSION ERA HANKIE WITH BEAUTIFUL HAND-MADE APPLIQUE’

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I still come across true vintage handkerchiefs once in a while and always collect them.  This one is not fine linen or even high quality cotton and started it’s life as a commercially-made piece that probably had no decoration excepting the machine-done edging, BUT the delicate applique needlework down in the left-lower corner is the real story.  Some woman who couldn’t afford more expensive linens made a dainty item with her own hands.  It is almost unbelievable with the tiny, tiny stitches and the steps taken to prepare the pieces that were sewn on to make the flower.

Girls used to be taught this kind of hand work in almost every home before WWII time, and many still afterwards.  If not lace-making, tatting or applique’ by the late mid-century, girls at least learned some embroidery, crochet or knitting.  My own grandmothers still knew how to do it.

Even though paper tissues are more convenient now, a fabric handkerchief is very elegant and just the thing when attending a wedding or other private affair.  The decoration on most of them is gorgeous, whether hand-done or by machine.  Even the printed patterns are lovely or at least colorful and amusing.  If you’re into home sewing, I’ve seen these hankies pieced together and turned into pretty pillow tops, table linens and even blouses, skirts or dresses.

So, another little story unfolds for me to share with you. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

A 1960’S NANCY FROCK – HOW FUN IS THAT?

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Haven’t found a “Nancy Frock” in quite a while so I’m very happy with this find.  A house-dress, day-dress combo.  The label says you can “wear it anywhere” – a smart style so typical of lower-priced dresses of that era.  Proudly “made in the U.S.A.”.  Such an old, iconic brand name label.

This poly shirtwaist style has an overall paisley print – so 1960’s. Although it doesn’t show well in the photo, the dyed-to-match buttons are sculpted and there is a little neck-tie beneath the collar, which dresses it up a bit.  I love it that this dress also is in virtually perfect condition.  The only flaw I see is the missing original belt.

Also, the original owner had written on the label “New  Long” but I’m not about to try to remove that – it’s part of the story that she probably intended to have it altered (or do it herself).  Looks like she never got around to it, so this garment may be new and unworn.  Fab.

When it rains, it pours.  So, more coming your way tomorrow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MID-CENTURY COTTON DRESS BY POLLY FLINDERS

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Children’s vintage clothing is not my specialty, but when I see a classic dress that has survived in such good condition I usually pick it up.  Polly Flinders brand made pretty, traditionally-designed frocks for babies and children during the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s.

What could be more classic than cotton with hand-smocked design.  Babes, toddlers and pre-schoolers have been wearing similar little day-dresses for decades.  Unfortunately, we all know what usually happens to children’s garments . . . . . . . it’s lucky if they last long enough for the next  brother or sister to wear them before they’re ready for the rag bin.

So, here’s a piece of history that WILL get passed along many decades later.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

LOVELY MID-CENTURY LINGERIE FULL SLIP – A FAVORITE TAILORING DECORATION ON THIS ONE

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Although I have so many pretty true vintage lingerie slips, when I find one this nice I always pick it up.  It will be just perfect under the dress I found a couple of days ago (look back on the blog) – right length and color.  The best thing about this one, though, is the design.

I love it when lace is sandwiched between layers of sheer fabric.  So subtle and beautiful, but also protected so it will wear well.  The picture doesn’t do it justice – you really have to see these garments up close to appreciate them.

Light and pretty – fortunately they don’t take up much space to store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

RARE MID-CENTURY REPTILE CLUTCH HANDBAG – THIS TIME IN CROCODILE

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Remember the lovely lizard bag I found a few days ago?  Well, here’s a sister from the same era, but in croc.  This one may be a bit older, due to the restrictions that were imposed on crocodile leather and other exotic skins after WWII.  As with fur, I’m not a fan of animal skins for our clothing and accessories and won’t buy any new ones but the true vintage examples are collectible pieces of fashion history to me.

As is the other one, this one’s a beauty.  It has a full-leather interior and several pockets.  Although there are some apparent discolorations on the outside (they might even be natural to the skin itself), it’s very clean and undamaged inside – always a delight when discovering an old handbag!

So, surprised again!  I always love that, and the surprises keep on coming . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

RARE AND UNUSUAL FIND – A BEAUTIFUL HAND-MADE KIMONO

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Here’s that gorgeous kimono found about a week ago.  It has been pieced together by hand, as as far as I can tell.  Some of the basting stitches are still present.  The blue-tinted edge dying around the lower hem (and also inside the sleeves) is something beautiful and I can’t figure out how it was done.

Don’t know how old this garment may be, but it’s been around for a while.  The lovely colors illustrate chrysanthemums and cranes – both, I think, traditional Japanese decorative motifs.  I’d love to know more about it’s origin and the history of the design.

It’s also VERY long, so might have been made for a man in spite of the floral pattern (?).  Not my area of expertise.  What next – you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM