NEW FIND – MORE LINGERIE SLIPS FROM WARTIME AND POST-WAR

Fabulous!  Both these slips are rare finds, but the one on left – the oldest – is REALLY RARE.  Let me describe them both, and the most fascinating details –

The long slip on right is a post-war 1940’s – early 1950’s length.  Look at the beautiful embroidery on the bodice.  It’s a very small size (not unusual at that time), but I can wear it and it’s perfect under many of my dresses from that era.  Nice to have the hemline lower for those midi-length frocks.

The shorter slip on left is the real elusive find.  It’s made of cotton or cotton blend, which is extremely rare and sought-after for wear during the warmer months.  I have a couple in white, but BLACK is like WOW!!!!!!!  Black sheer summer dresses in my wardrobe will get a lot more wear now.  Also, look at the bodice decoration – cute embroidery and RUCHING, which is rarely seen and an older style of embellishment.

The red color of the lace may be due to the effects of perspiration over time.  It’s so uniform that I’m not sure about this, but could be that the lace is of a different fabric content (likely) which reacted to the chemicals in sweat.  It could be re-dyed but it is kind of pretty as is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE MID-CENTURY SEPARATES FOR SPRING AND SUMMER

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Not always the most exciting things to find, but I am always thrilled because true vintage wardrobes cannot be built without them.  What will you wear with that great 1940’s skirt or pair of slacks?  What blouse will be just right under the beautiful skirt suit?

I also love these garments because of the fabric and tailoring.  A hand-knitted sweater from back in the day is always a great find because they’re RARE and much more nicely crafted than machine-knit mass-produced clothing in the stores today.  I love the Forties/Fifties style of this one with gathered shoulders and ribbed cuffs, fitted waist and a scalloped boat neck.  The short-sleeved shirt is a well-tailored cotton version, so common during the 1950’s and early 1960’s for everyday wear.  The pale pastel palette will be just right with skirts, shorts, jeans and summer whites.

I hit the separates jackpot which I’ll continue to show you tomorrow.  Stay tuned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

WELL-MADE 1980’S DOES 1940’S DAY DRESS

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This is a very cute dress, faithful in many ways to the styles and fabrics of the 1940’s.  Women of that time with moderate means would wear designs like this for work and general day-wear.

Although I’d prefer the real thing,  many 1970’s and 1980’s garments that were doing the Forties thing are worth adding to the wardrobe.  Not much since then.

Notice the interesting buttons, geometric print, slash pockets and waist treatment.  It was also made by Damon’s, a division of Damon and Draper, well-known clothier since the early 1900’s.  This one has found a place!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

RARE MID-CENTURY REPTILE CLUTCH HANDBAG – THIS TIME IN CROCODILE

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Remember the lovely lizard bag I found a few days ago?  Well, here’s a sister from the same era, but in croc.  This one may be a bit older, due to the restrictions that were imposed on crocodile leather and other exotic skins after WWII.  As with fur, I’m not a fan of animal skins for our clothing and accessories and won’t buy any new ones but the true vintage examples are collectible pieces of fashion history to me.

As is the other one, this one’s a beauty.  It has a full-leather interior and several pockets.  Although there are some apparent discolorations on the outside (they might even be natural to the skin itself), it’s very clean and undamaged inside – always a delight when discovering an old handbag!

So, surprised again!  I always love that, and the surprises keep on coming . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

TRUE VINTAGE 1940’S SWEATER – BLOUSE IN LIGHTWEIGHT WOOL

A 1940'S SWEATER - BLOUSE IN LIGHTWEIGHT WOOL

Very feminine, very versatile.  I photographed it on Madge and it fits her “VA –  VOOM” like a Fifties sweater-girl but I think I’d like to see it on more petite Stella, instead.

This little blouse is a fine sweater-knit.  Looks great with pants or skirts.  Although it doesn’t show well in the photo, the small collar is decorated with delicate applique and beads.  I haven’t tried it yet with the ’40’s slacks shown yesterday but the color is close so it might be perfect!  What a fabulous find.

This blouse is a cross between sportswear and dress-wear.  In the Forties, daily outfits were usually more finely tailored and sophisticated than what is worn now, no matter how “cute”.  If you really want to be well-dressed, take a lesson from true vintage fashion . . . . . . . . . .. ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

VERY UNUSUAL DISCOVERY: TRUE VINTAGE 1940’S WOMEN’S(?) SLACKS BY THE HAGGAR COMPANY!!!

via VERY UNUSUAL DISCOVERY: TRUE VINTAGE 1940’S WOMEN’S(?) SLACKS BY THE HAGGAR COMPANY!!!

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940’S – 1950’S BED JACKETS

THE LAST (I THINK . . . AT LEAST, FOR NOW) OF MY BEAUTIFUL 1940'S - 1950'S BED JACKETS

With this photo, I’ve shown most of my true vintage bed jacket collection.  But, as always, you just never know . . . . . . . .

The one on the left is obviously the most unusual, and the oldest (probably 1940’s), but look at the gorgeous lace, ribbons and embroidery, the feminine styles, the soft and flattering  blues of the 1950’s versions.  And, even quilting, for a morning that’s colder. No wonder I love them and do a happy dance when I find another.

All of these were probably owned by women from middle-income families and were part of an average wardrobe – frequently used.  Oh, the charm of it all . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM