SECOND FIND: GREAT GABARDINE JACKET FROM THE 1940’S

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Oh, I love this – just my style.  Dark navy gabardine fabric with a fabric-covered belt and interesting details.  Peplum waistlines are so flattering, on the right figure.

This beauty is in such good condition for it’s age.  I do need to replace the tattered lining and re-install shoulder pads, but that is a minor repair.  The best things are the authentic 1940’s styling, the belt in great condition, the quality fabric and tailoring.  I’ll wear it forever.

What’s next?  You just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

PROBABLY FROM THE 1940’S – A LOVELY HANDBAG IN SILK, BY ROSENFELD

A very pretty fabric handbag in faille on the outside and satin on the inside both, I believe, of silk.  With hardly any wear, the inside is pristine.  I love the kiss clasp inset with black cabochons and the sculptured metal frame.

So, that’s what I’ve been doing on the side in the past few days.  What next?  You just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

NEW FIND – MORE LINGERIE SLIPS FROM WARTIME AND POST-WAR

Fabulous!  Both these slips are rare finds, but the one on left – the oldest – is REALLY RARE.  Let me describe them both, and the most fascinating details –

The long slip on right is a post-war 1940’s – early 1950’s length.  Look at the beautiful embroidery on the bodice.  It’s a very small size (not unusual at that time), but I can wear it and it’s perfect under many of my dresses from that era.  Nice to have the hemline lower for those midi-length frocks.

The shorter slip on left is the real elusive find.  It’s made of cotton or cotton blend, which is extremely rare and sought-after for wear during the warmer months.  I have a couple in white, but BLACK is like WOW!!!!!!!  Black sheer summer dresses in my wardrobe will get a lot more wear now.  Also, look at the bodice decoration – cute embroidery and RUCHING, which is rarely seen and an older style of embellishment.

The red color of the lace may be due to the effects of perspiration over time.  It’s so uniform that I’m not sure about this, but could be that the lace is of a different fabric content (likely) which reacted to the chemicals in sweat.  It could be re-dyed but it is kind of pretty as is . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

POST-WAR DRESSY DINNER FROCK, CUSTOM-TAILORED IN SOUTH AMERICA

Here’s another dressy frock from Montevideo, Uruguay – probably just a few years younger than her sister shown yesterday.  This dress is stylish, but not as Crawford vampish as the other.  The 1940’s styling has been played down, excepting for the puffy shoulders and embroidered mesh trim.  I forgot to take a picture with the black curly lamb jacket  which was also a recent find, from the early 1950’s.  Would be a perfect wrap over this dress.

No, it is not bare on the bodice.  The mesh has been lined with a flesh-tone panel which is a perfect match for bare skin peeking out at the shoulders.  The tailoring of these mid-century frocks is just astounding, especially when they were hand-made by dressmakers.  The well-to-do ladies in Montevideo would have had much of their clothing custom-made to their specifications and fit.

However, remember the dressing gown from a few days ago?  It was also hand-made, but from France, and probably purchased before the European war.  Many Montevidean women purchased French fashions and accessories back in the day.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

HERE COME THE TRUE VINTAGE DAY-DRESSES, AND THIS ONE IS JUST THE CAT’S PAJAMAS FOR ANY MOTHER-TO-BE

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Believe it or not, it IS a maternity dress!  From the Forties or early Fifties!!  The brand name is Lady in Waiting (how cute).  What a fun, fun find!

Nothing could be more practical or economical than this baby (pun intended).  The fabric is cotton, rayon or a blend in a colorful print.  Perfect for a summer pregnancy.  The dress is simple and was not expensive, but so ingeniously designed and convenient!

The easy, breezy shirtwaist style is always in fashion and the flowing fabric is very forgiving.  Underneath that wrap-around wasp waist sash is extra material and a set of 3 snaps near each side seam which allow the dress to be let out up to about 10 inches.  So, no matter the stage she’s at, this mama could wear the dress from start to finish and beyond.

Good old American ingenuity (not to imply that we’re the only ones).  I love clever fashion ideas like this one.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

WARTIME MYSTERY CUSTOM-TAILORED NIGHTGOWN – WHAT A FIND!

Fabulous late 1930’s – early 1940’s styling details, hand-tailoring and original(?) fabrics???  I know the design (a relative had one similar).  The embroidered mesh on the bodice is similar to the wartime dressing gown shown a couple of days ago.  The synthetic(?) fabric is like nothing I’ve felt before.  The gusset at the hemline is a period feature.

IS THIS AN ORIGINAL WWI – WWII GOWN OR AN EXPERTLY-MADE REPRODUCTION?  I can’t be sure.  It’s in almost-perfect condition, but has been around for a while.  No label, of course.  Would love to know it’s story.  Any ideas, you well-trained experts out there? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MY BEAUTIFUL WARTIME FRENCH-MADE DRESSING GOWN FROM MONTEVIDEO

Couldn’t wait to get this gorgeous gown onto Stella.  She’s just the right size (and maybe I am, too, if I can bear to risk wearing it!).  The embroidered netting and roses on rayon are so, so 1930’s – 1940’s.

I love the special tailoring touches from that time such as the longer hem in back that makes a little train.  This dress was probably meant to fit someone a little shorter than Stel.

It would seem that Montevideans from early in the wartime era loved their fashions and accessories from France.   More to come . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM