MID – CENTURY TRUE VINTAGE ELEGANCE: WHAT REALLY MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

IMG_1400IMG_1403In these few photos IMG_1404from an early – 1960’s needlework magazine, the styles are very plain and, in some cases, they are so generic that they’re very boring!  BUT, every woman pictured looks smart, elegant, fashionable and attractive.

Obviously, it’s not mostly about their clothing.  Sure, they’re all slim and attractive people but that’s not the main thing, either.  Take away the good fit and quality of what they are wearing (super-important as a base for everything else) and what is left that REALLY does it?

It’s their grooming, posture and ACCESSORIES.  None of those ensembles would look half as good without the accessorizing touches – imagine each of them without the necklace, bracelet, gloves or handsome handbag.  Makes a big difference, doesn’t it?

So, as much as I love fabulous true vintage style and details I also know that I can easily stand out in a room dressed in a plain ’50’s skirt and sweater, or even a pair of jeans with a great true vintage shirt.  Our grandmothers understood that perfectly.  And today, it’s VERY easy NOT to stand out . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

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AGAIN, FUN AND RARE TO FIND – ANOTHER HAND-KNIT BABY JACKET

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It is just incredible that these things survive!  Although this cute little coat could have been made more recently by a master needle-worker, I’m betting that it’s a mid-century creation.  Much prettier in person, the yoke is composed of very intricate-looking sculptural stitches and the yarn feels like angora.

Similar to the one I showed several weeks ago, it’s pink – probably made for a girl back in the day since pink for girls and blue for boys was pretty much what everybody did when it came to babies.  There are still some women around who can knit well and a few who have taught themselves in order to revive these old skills.  But, they are a rare breed.  A classic garment like this is worth collecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

McCALL’S NEEDLEWORK SPRING CARDIGANS FROM 1961

IMG_1086IMG_1087IMG_1088IMG_1089     Dig the hairstyles, too.  Now that Christmas and New Year’s celebrations were over, women in 1961 turned their attention to Spring and travel styles, as well as Prom & Easter.

With the crazy weather, we’re also thinking of flowers and sunny colors.  Although our grandmothers and great-grandmothers thought about new needlework projects  in their spare time, it’s still FASHION, and we continue to think about it now, but in different ways (what’s on my favorite Internet site?).

in 1961, the subscribers to McCall’s Needlework and Crafts magazine looked forward to these styles.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

RARE FIND! THE SWEETEST MID-CENTURY HANDMADE BABY JACKET

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I love finding true vintage children’s clothing!  So often, they’ve been worn out or wrecked long before they could be enjoyed 50 or 60 years down the road.  This one is lovely wool with angora trim and true vintage plastic buttons on stems.  Someone saved it and cherished it after it was lightly used.

The custom-made label at the neck would date no earlier than the 1960’s, but it’s hard to say when it as put there.  The jacket itself, knitted and crocheted by hand, was either made in the 1940’s, 1950’s or early 1960’s or was made more recently from a pattern from one of those mid-century dates.

The flared style was probably for a little girl, back in the day when pink and blue colors were reserved exclusively for female and male babies.  Plenty of room for a diaper and plastic pants under that full skirt!  The infant who wore this was probably still in them.

Who was the knitter?  Grandma?  Auntie?  Sister?  Mommy?  So much fun to guess.  Whoever made this jacket was a very skilled needleworker and probably had some time on her hands.  It’s just so very precious . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

 

TRUE VINTAGE MID-CENTURY FALL COATS & JACKETS TO MAKE AT HOME!

IMG_1030 IMG_1048 Need a new coat?  Well, in just a few minutes of your spare time . . . . . . Right!   McCalls Needlework Magazine used to publish patterns for projects like these all year.  In the 1950’s and 1960’s it was so common.

Aren’t they beautiful? – But, can you imagine making one??  Your grandmother might have.  I rarely find a hand-knitted one now, but once in a while . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

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SPEAKING OF FIFTIES & SIXTIES SWEATERS – SOME FUN EXAMPLES TO KNIT AT HOME!

IMG_1041IMG_1042IMG_1044IMG_1045IMG_1032      McCalls needlework magazine from 1961 has patterns and instructions for these neat tops.  It was one of those times when the fashion gets really playful.  My most recent finds on this trip are ’60’s!

Not quite so intimidating as trying to make some of the dresses and coats, but challenging enough!  There’s no mistaking the styles from that time and I’ll be showing more . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

A TRUE VINTAGE DO-IT-YOURSELF WARDROBE PLAN FOR YOUR 1956 OCEAN CRUISE

IMG_0970 IMG_0971 IMG_0969 IMG_0968 IMG_0967 IMG_0965 IMG_0964Can you imagine?!   You’re planning to set sail in a few weeks.  Why not spend that time knitting and crocheting your entire wardrobe for the trip?   Sound like a good idea?   Think of the money you’ll save!   Imagine the compliments and envious looks when other women see your gorgeous, custom-made outfits.  Just pull out the instructions in your latest issue of the McCall’s needlework magazine.

Such ambition those mid-century women had!  My pillbox is off to them . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM