TRUE VINTAGE MARILYN MONROE WANNABE RECREATED THIS ICONIC DRESS

 

IMG_1801     Just found this mid-century custom-tailored frock that is modeled after Marilyn’s famous costume in the 1954 movie The Seven Year Itch.  Although it’s a bit too sweet, made of cotton poplin flocked with cotton candy pink and green, the style is close to the original.

Some gal got carried away by that sidewalk scene above the subway grate.  It’s always fun to find something that tells a story, like this.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE GOWN MODELED AFTER GRACE KELLY’S IN THE HITCHCOCK MOVIE “REAR WINDOW”

A very favorite find, custom-tailored in the early 1950’s after one that Grace Kelly’s character, Lisa, wore in the classic Alfred Hitchcock movie, Rear Window.  Lisa’s dress had a yellow printed skirt, rather than blue.  I even know the woman who made this frock in 1954!

The black fabric in the bodice is stretchy and the neckline very unusual.  It fits perfectly, no matter how your own curves go!  The skirt is of three layers, with sheer fabric on top and netting underneath.  The little black “leaves” are embroidered on the sheer overlay.

What could be more fabulous? – a costume similar to one worn by one of my all-time favorite actresses in a favorite movie by a favorite director! How intriguing . . . . . .. . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

ELEGANT TRUE VINTAGE GLOVES FROM THE 1950’S & ’60’S – AN ACCESSORY WORTH COLLECTING

NOTHING MORE ELEGANT, EVEN FOR EVERYDAY . . . . . . .

Magicvintagespy

ELEGANT TRUE VINTAGE GLOVES FROM THE 1950'S & '60'S - AN ACCESSORY WORTH COLLECTING

Ho – hum, gloves . . . . .? Not these. There is nothing more stylish and luxurious than a beautiful pair of kid-skin gloves, while they also protect your hands.

Beautifully-made and elegant in lines, many that I have found have no decoration – many have small subtle designs near the wrist. Some, like the beige pair, have decorated panels of crochet or contrasting leather. The variations are endless. I’ll be showing more of them . . . . .

These gloves are not meant for really cold weather, but they’re great for what we’re into now. If looked after, they’ll last a long time.

Don’t wear these if you have a dirty job ahead, but for something more delicate and when you’d rather not leave fingerprints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .

MORGANA…

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TRUE VINTAGE FULL CIRCLE SKIRT – A SOUVENIR OF MEXICO CIRCA 1950’S

Source: TRUE VINTAGE FULL CIRCLE SKIRT – A SOUVENIR OF MEXICO CIRCA 1950’S

TRUE VINTAGE LESLIE FAY ORIGINAL JACKET FROM THE LATE 1940’S – 1950’S – A FAVORITE!!

TRUE VINTAGE 3-SEASON FASHION JACKET FROM THE EARLY FIFTIES

Magicvintagespy

TRUE VINTAGE LESLIE FAY ORIGINAL JACKET FROM THE LATE 1940'S - 1950'S - A FAVORITE!!

I just love this jacket! Look at the details – the red lining, black velveteen collar, bracelet – length sleeves, shoulder pads, big black buttons and – surprise! – the body is a check of white and true navy blue!

It looks so good with a solid true navy or black skirt or slacks, or over a plain dress. Just stylish with good lines, fit and overall quality – like the best!  A perfect 3-season garment.

Sleuthing tip:  Be careful about Leslie Fay garments when searching for true vintage, because the company is still in business (as are some others from that era) and the item you’re looking at might have been made this year!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

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3 TRUE VINTAGE NATIVE AMERICAN/HAWAIIAN COSTUMES FROM THE 1940’S – 1950’S

3 TRUE VINTAGE NATIVE AMERICAN/HAWAIIAN COSTUMES FROM THE 1940'S – 1950'S.

LAST OF THE TRUE VINTAGE 1950’S COTTON SHIRTWAISTS FOR THIS YEAR’S SEASON (FAMOUS LAST WORDS . . . . . . . .)

LAST OF THE TRUE VINTAGE 1950'S COTTON SHIRTWAISTS FOR THIS YEAR'S SEASON (FAMOUS LAST WORDS . . . . . . . .).