WONDERFUL LATE 1960’S – 1970’S CASUAL PARTY PEASANT DRESS

 

Eyelet and lace and peep-through panels and flounces.  One of the best of this genre had been hiding out for a long time.  So glad I nabbed it – and so pristine!

As much as I love the old formals, this frock has a lot more versatility from day to night, though it probably could have gone to the Prom at some smaller school in it’s day.  It would also make an interesting wedding dress.

That’s what’s so much fun about vintage fashion finding (well, one of the things) – the ideas and possibilities are almost endless.  No rules!!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BEAUTIFUL FLORAL COTTON GOWN – MADE IN HAWAII?????

Isn’t this print gorgeous?  And, the cotton is super, super soft – probably due to age and washings as well as a high-quality fabric.

Another mystery for me!  Can’t date it exactly – there is no label and signs say that it was hand-tailored.  The style is not traditional Hawaiian, but certain details, such as the pleat in the back of the skirt and the fabulous material, make me think of other vintage gowns made there.

No matter.  It’s lovely and tiny but, if I can comfortably wear it it’s a keeper!  We’ll see . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

LOVE THIS HAND-TAILORED COTTON GOWN IN A PRETTY PEONY PRINT

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The colors are beautiful and the styling unusual, with a faux train detail back and front – falling from the bodice.  My first impression was that this dress may have been made in Hawaii, but I’m not sure.  There is no label and my impression is that it was made by an individual with tailoring expertise or at a small tailoring shop.

The fabric and construction details say true vintage to me, so I’m going with that.  Such a pretty design – it floats from just above the bust-line, swirling down to the hem, which is cut just a little longer in the back to make the dress fall properly.  This is a detail that is not often (if ever) seen in mainstream patterns that have been cut recently – one of the important styling elements that have gone by the wayside in modern times.  Surely true couture houses still observe them(?).

Anyway, gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous.  Very informal but extremely elegant.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

LATE 1960’S 1970’S PRAIRIE STYLE DRESS FIND – THIS ONE CAN HAVE MANY LIVES

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Could be a Prom – party, wedding or casual summer day dress according to your wish!  Love well-made frocks like this one, which has pretty fabric and trim as well as a liner that prevents see-through (excepting for a bit at the midriff and on the sleeves).  Just right!

I’m always super-happy to find a gown or long dress of this genre and era.  And, in perfect condition.  Things just keep getting better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE NIGHTGOWNS – 1940’S TO 1950’S

TRUE VINTAGE NIGHTGOWNS - 1940'S TO 1950'S

More things that I love about colder weather – it’s a time when we feel like wearing something a little heavier at night (or just wearing something, period).  Here are 3 beautiful nylon gowns with applique’, embroidery, bows, lace and gathers.

Back when it was a pleasure to get dressed!  The longest is from the ’40’s, I believe, or the very early ’50’s.  Nylon was rationed during wartime,  so that would put it into the late ’40’s at the earliest.

The two shorter gowns would be from the ’50’s and show a little more decoration – when items were more lavish after the Forties, and hemlines higher.

Like ’50’s lingerie, you can’t beat the nightgowns of that time for feminine detail and, sometimes, over-the-top frills!  On the other hand, early ’30’s and  ’40’s silk gowns are to die for.  We’ll see some of that, too.

Dressing for day or dressing for bed – could be an adventure in itself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

TRUE VINTAGE 1960’S HOLIDAY VELVET DRESSY HANDBAG

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When I discovered this purse, it was the clasp as well as the fabric that hooked me.  I discovered several dark green velvet garments around the same time and you could almost think that that they were made to go together. So, this was a re-purposing & recycling triumph as well as a true vintage score. Doesn’t get better than that . .. . . . . . ..  well, yes, it does, but that will be another story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

GORGEOUS CUSTOM-MADE POST-WAR FORMAL GOWN IN SUMPTUOUS BLACK RAYON VELVET

Although very similar, I might place this dress as having been made a little earlier than the one shown yesterday – looks late 1940’s to me.  It might or might not have been worn with a crinoline underneath.  Like the other, it’s completely hand-made and this one has the tailor’s label sewn into the neckline.

One of the best things about this gown is the fabric – a plush, heavy velvet that feels like old rayon.  Love the sweetheart neckline and off-the-shoulder sleeves that, to my taste, are done a bit more artfully than those on yesterday’s dress.  I think it’s mostly a style change that took place over a couple of years around the turn of the ’40’s to ’50’s decade.

Anyway, who wouldn’t love it!  I so wonder what events these dresses were made for and where they went.  That part of the mystery is as yet unsolved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM