FUN FIND TODAY! 2 MID-CENTURY HOUSE-DRESSES

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I always love finding dresses like this from back in the day.  Many women wore these at home on a daily basis, and didn’t worry too much if they had to run out for an errand – a little freshening-up:  a combing and touch of hairspray, powder & lipstick and off they went to the supermarket.

Other women, who worked in the garment unions, made these dresses in large quantities.  Most of them found their way to the rubbish bin after being worn for years of cooking and housecleaning, but a few of them made it out alive.  Love the lines of the slightly older style on the right.

So, here we have two of those gals who were well looked-after and might have lived a more leisurely life.  They were half-sizes (plus) in their time but now would be lucky to qualify as large size.  However, their styles are forgiving and may serve me very well just as they did their first owners.  Fun!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BEAUTIFUL FLORAL COTTON GOWN – MADE IN HAWAII?????

Isn’t this print gorgeous?  And, the cotton is super, super soft – probably due to age and washings as well as a high-quality fabric.

Another mystery for me!  Can’t date it exactly – there is no label and signs say that it was hand-tailored.  The style is not traditional Hawaiian, but certain details, such as the pleat in the back of the skirt and the fabulous material, make me think of other vintage gowns made there.

No matter.  It’s lovely and tiny but, if I can comfortably wear it it’s a keeper!  We’ll see . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

WARTIME MYSTERY CUSTOM-TAILORED NIGHTGOWN – WHAT A FIND!

Fabulous late 1930’s – early 1940’s styling details, hand-tailoring and original(?) fabrics???  I know the design (a relative had one similar).  The embroidered mesh on the bodice is similar to the wartime dressing gown shown a couple of days ago.  The synthetic(?) fabric is like nothing I’ve felt before.  The gusset at the hemline is a period feature.

IS THIS AN ORIGINAL WWI – WWII GOWN OR AN EXPERTLY-MADE REPRODUCTION?  I can’t be sure.  It’s in almost-perfect condition, but has been around for a while.  No label, of course.  Would love to know it’s story.  Any ideas, you well-trained experts out there? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

ANOTHER UNUSUAL VINTAGE LOUNGE-WEAR KIMONO – TRADITIONAL EAST ASIAN

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What a beautiful handmade garment!  I can’t date it and have never discovered one like it before.  Because of the traditional style and motifs, it may be hard to say exactly how old it is.  Could be several decades old, or very modern.  I was attracted by the beautiful colors and the hand-tailoring.

The belt I have used is not original, but necessary for this robe.  As I understand it, obi belts are often made separately from the robe, to special order.

Although it seems very large and long, after you wrap it it fits little size 2 Stella.  What a puzzle – not sure who it would have been made for.  The motif of cranes suggest a man (?) but I’m certainly no expert on these!  But wait – more mysteries to come . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MY BEAUTIFUL WARTIME FRENCH-MADE DRESSING GOWN FROM MONTEVIDEO

Couldn’t wait to get this gorgeous gown onto Stella.  She’s just the right size (and maybe I am, too, if I can bear to risk wearing it!).  The embroidered netting and roses on rayon are so, so 1930’s – 1940’s.

I love the special tailoring touches from that time such as the longer hem in back that makes a little train.  This dress was probably meant to fit someone a little shorter than Stel.

It would seem that Montevideans from early in the wartime era loved their fashions and accessories from France.   More to come . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

JUST FOUND! GORGEOUS 1930’S – 1940’S WARTIME TO POST-WAR RAYON BED JACKET

 

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What a neat discovery!  I have 2 or 3 lingerie bed jackets from this era already, but haven’t found another for a long time.  Rare, rare, rare.  This one may have been part of some woman’s trousseau, which she stored away lovingly for decades.  Some were made of silk.  This one is glossy rayon.

Pretty bed jackets from the post-war 1950’s are also fabulous, but much different from the older wartime ones.  Notice in the detail close-up the embroidered mesh decoration.  Remember that from the nightgown I showed just a few days ago?

Oh, I’m over the moon again and will also store this garment away lovingly, probably for decades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

A VERY SPECIAL HANDMADE LINGERIE NIGHTGOWN WITH MYSTERY HERITAGE

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This is such a WONDERFUL find (aren’t they all?)!  It’s a bit of a mystery, which I love. . . .

The style is late 1930’s – early 1940’s and it’s been custom – made.  There’s no label or sign that there ever was one.  The bodice has embroidered netting (similar to the 1930’s house-dress I found a few months ago in Montevideo – remember?).  It’s finished almost entirely with french seams.  Little bow detail on the bodice – lots of hand-work.

The fabric is some kind of synthetic which isn’t like vintage fabrics I’m familiar with NOR modern ones!?#  There is virtually no sign of wear and just a little bit of age or storage-related damage, which was easy to fix.  The conundrum is – – – – – – – – — – – – – – – – – – :

it’s either true vintage from the WWII era OR a reproduction (not retro-style fashion) which has been expertly made to be identical to the originals.  Whoopsie doo!  Either way, it’s a fabulous gown and a rare and unique discovery which will look stunning on Stella.  More to come . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM