HOME-DESIGNED 1960’s MOD-PRINT MATERNITY BLOUSE

So unusual to find a maternity blouse this old, let alone two of them within a couple of weeks! This example is definitely from the 1960’s, per the fabric, but with styling from an even earlier era.

Peter Pan collar, contrasting cuffs, back button closure and a deep inverted pleat in front. Although maternity wear was available commercially long before this garment was made, most early pregnancy-wear seems to have been sewn at home.

It’s fun to see prim and proper pregnant meet psychedelic! More to come – stay tuned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

THREE OF MY OLDEST TRUE VINTAGE HAWAIIAN GOWNS

THREE OF MY MOST VINTAGE HAWAIIAN GOWNS

From the 1960’s back to, maybe the 1920’s, these three are my oldest vintage examples of Hawaiian gowns.  From the farthest left, to right –

Psychedelic hues and patterns on the far left – not hard to see the late Sixties here.  The center dress is from the 1950’s and is fashioned in the traditional Hawaiian style, with a panel on the back that is almost like a train, without the dragging hem.

On the far right is a mystery dress with a metal side zipper. It has images in the print that are not your standard Hawaiian shirt variety and the fabric is very different –

instead of being the heavy cotton that I’d usually expect, it is a fluid material that I’d guess is rayon. If the label did not indicate that it was made in Hawaii, I’d say it had come from Japan.  The toggle closure at the neck is also something often seen on Chinese and Japanese garments. It’s also got a very 1930’s cut – close to the body.

Hmmm . . . . . . . . . this is REALLY Mata Hari undercover espionage stuff.  I wonder how she wound her way to the place where I discovered her . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE LATE ’60’S – EARLY ’70’S CALIFORNIA NOUVEAUX HIPPIE DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE LATE '60'S - EARLY '70'S CALIFORNIA NOUVEAUX HIPPIE DRESS

Mod, psychedelic, polyester knit dress – was made just a little past the time of the hey-day of the hippie/back-to-the-land movement.  About the time that popular fashions were beginning to turn back toward mainstream, but still liking the counter-culture vibe in a more modest way.

Prairie-style was also becoming a big thing around this time – leaning more toward Jessica (McLintock) designs than Janice Joplin’s Salvation Army finds.  Also,  polyester was beginning to replace cotton in a big way.

Not quite your pure Love-In roll-a-joint party outfit, but you could still get by with it . . . . . try doing it at a patio party  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

LOTS OF 1960’S MOD – THIS ONE FOUND IN PARIS!

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A standard mod-look vintage plus-size day dress from the early-mid Sixties, but, this one is rare to find today because the fabric is Arnel Triacetate – not many of them around now!  It got pushed out of the marketplace by good old polyester, which had some easier-care qualities.

However, triacetate feels really good and not exactly like any of the many polyester incarnations that are possible.  That’s the beauty of true vintage fabrics – the qualities of most have not/cannot be duplicated by more modern materials.  There’s just nothing like them . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN,THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MOD MAD MEN TRUE VINTAGE 1960’S DRESS WITH MATCHING JACKET

MOD 1960'S DRESS WITH MATCHING JACKET

This outfit was custom tailored in the mid-1960’s.  Bell sleeves and easy fit. The fabric is a swirly paisley print in aqua tones and it includes the  addition of a matching jacket to create an ensemble.

So many dresses in the ’50’s and ’60’s were made with matching jackets and even matching accessories.  Though this is a fairly casual dress, it follows that lady-like trend and seems to teeter on the edge of the fashion divide between the rather prissy Fifties and early Sixties and the Mod and wild times just after.  Looks like the dressmaker originally intended to make a sleeveless frock, then changed her mind.   As it is, we’ve got a day dress that Twiggy would look just fab in, photographed on some 1965 magazine cover.

What a luxury to have your own dressmaker to custom-tailor your wardrobe! So many women did.  Most neighborhoods in the city had a tailor’s shop where this kind of work was done.  In towns and villages there was usually a woman nearby who did dressmaking in her  own home.  And, of course, many women were still doing their own home sewing then.

Maybe I’ll take the sleeves off some time and wear this dress with the jacket – but, no . . . . love the dress just as it is.  I’ll check out the jacket with my selection of skirts  . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

THREE PIECES OF TRUE VINTAGE 1960’S COSTUME JEWELRY

THREE PIECES OF TRUE VINTAGE 1960'S COSTUME JEWELRY

I’ll be showing highlights of my vintage jewelry collection, along with the shoes and dresses.  Here are three pieces which were very characteristic of the Sixties decade.

Enameled pins were very popular – especially in flower shapes. Also, large pendants that hung to the chest were a big thing.

The pin is not marked, nor is the middle pendant but I think that the chain which came with it said it was by Trifari.  The gold-color pendant with chain is by Sarah Coventry. Modernistic shapes were really popular.

Any one of these really sparks up an outfit and gives it a mod, mid-sixties flair.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE 1960’S MOD ARNEL SHEATH FROM PARIS

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A MOD PRINT IN RARE ARNEL FABRIC!

Moving forward in time 20 years or so, this iconic ’60’s dress is an unusual discovery.  In virtually perfect condition, what a find!

The fabric, Arnel triacetate, was a biggie for a few years but soon gave way to acrylic and polyester.  Granted, there are a few care issues that would have made the change more convenient but we’ve always lost something when those older fabrics were replaced with the “new and improved”.  The sheen and the feel of this material has never been duplicated, as far as I can tell.

Of course, the rarity and special qualities of these old pieces are what give me the biggest kick when I find one!  It would be boring if things made today looked and felt the same. Some day we’ll be able to see this only in museums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM