McCALL’S NEEDLEWORK MAGAZINE FEATURE FROM 1956 – MAKE YOUR OWN HATS

IMG_0933IMG_0934
Since, at that time, a hat was a must-add to your outfit almost every day, being able to make your own saved women a lot of money.  At the beginning of every season, women would hustle to up-date their accessories.  Of course, a new hat from a milliner or a dress shop would be the first choice, but those could be pricey, even then.  And, like shoes, a variety of different hats was the best thing!

These DIY styles are so cute.  Like the dresses and sweaters I’ve shown from these vintages magazines, they range from casual to very dressy and can be surprising in how professional they look.

Up through the Fifties, at least, being able to construct and maintain the family’s clothing was an essential part of most housewives’ duties, along with cooking and cleaning. Although I’m told it could be fun, it was not a hobby . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE FIFTIES / EARLY SIXTIES SCARF BANDEAUS – BEAUTIFUL FOR SUMMER!

TRUE VINTAGE FIFTIES / EARLY SIXTIES SCARF BANDEAUS - BEAUTIFUL FOR SUMMER!

These scarves are of a vintage style I see rarely – sewn in a continuous circle and open in the back.  You can scrunch and spread them but they have no elastic built in.  Grace Kelly and other mid-century film stars loved this style.

The idea is to make a chic “hat”, pinned and adjusted to your type of hairstyle, or a quick and elegant solution to bad hair days.  They’re usually sheer rayon, nylon or silk.

Must have been, more or less, a brief “fad”. It would be easy to make or fake now, but the real thing is always more intriguing . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE CLASSIC MANTILLA SCARVES – A CULTURE OF SPIRIT, TRADITION, MYSTERY AND ALLURE

TRUE VINTAGE CLASSIC MANTILLA SCARVES - A CULTURE OF SPIRIT, TRADITION, MYSTERY AND ALLURE

Marlene and Celia are back to model a series of true vintage scarves and . . .. .. Daphne, far right.  She’s stuck in the ’60’s and ’70’s and is kind of a California casual gal so doesn’t care much for most of my elegant looks.   However, she is wearing the less traditional, graphic patterned lace today.   I suspect that these are from the 1960’s.

In the U.S., many women of the Catholic faith used to keep lace head coverings around to wear to church and they’ve always been popular souvenirs of a trip to Spain where they were called mantillas (roughly pronounced mon-tee-ya).  Over the centuries women and girls have worn them not only in strictly religious ceremonies, including weddings and funerals, but at traditional social events, too.  It seems that many cultures have their own version of the lace scarf and how to wear it.

So, there are many interpretations of the lace “mantle” and how/where to wear one. Make up your own . . . . whenever a touch of elegance, allure and the unexpected is desirable . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

A MAGICAL FIND – PRETTY TRUE VINTAGE VEIL ILLUSION HAT

IMG_3562

Couldn’t be simpler, but that’s what makes it so elegant and lovely.  I also like the midnight navy color – a nice switch from black.

Velvet and netting – nothing is more flattering and alluring while adding a touch of mystery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

ANOTHER 1940’S HAT FIND – THIS ONE WITH THE BOX!

img_3427.jpgIMG_3404

This is my final “new” hat-find, for now.  I’m always tickled to have the original box for any of my hats!  In this case, I don’t know the brand of the hat (if there was one) but I know WHERE it came from.  The department store Famous-Barr in St. Louis, MO was a division of the Macy’s chain for decades and finally closed in 2013.  It had evolved in the early 20th century from two other store members of the Federated Department Stores organization and opened in 1914.  The old department stores were such fun and so exciting for women, where they could receive very personal and professional service – now we just see glimpses of them in classic movies.  Modern malls and superstores can’t compare.

Anyway, this “pretty” with a black velvet crown, bow decoration and a lacy woven ribbon brim is elegant without the weight of heavier styles that might dominate during the colder months.  This one lets you carry the season-less drama of black into Summer and early Fall.  Works for me . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

 

 

SOPHISTICATED 1940’S LADIES’ HAT OF SUEDED WOOL FELT

i

 

This hat is made of the most wonderful fabric that feels almost like fine suede leather! It’s so hard, sometimes, to photograph black items – I hope that you can see the two bows under the brim in the first photo.  The hat is almost a beret, but has stitched decoration on top and a kind of souffle’ construction so that it can puff up or lay flat on the head.

I suspect that it would be worn more like the first photo, in order to expose the bows above the hairline.  Tricky to do with any kind of hairdo and probably would require hatpins.  What women used to go through to get the “right” look!

So, maybe it was designed to be worn with a sleek head and hair coiled up underneath or massed beneath at the nape of the neck.  It’s fun to wonder what the milliner who designed this beauty had in mind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

ANOTHER WARTIME – POST-WAR STRAW HAT. THIS ONE HAS SUEDE TRIM!

IMG_3412

Spring, Summer, Fall?  Who cares?!  This unusual ladies hat will make any simple outfit a stand-out.  Suede leather is a unique combination with the woven straw.

The odd UFO platter shape makes me lean toward dating it in the Forties, but who knows for sure.  During the decades of millinery-mania, there were many innovative and even bizarre styles.

It’s so fun to find an example of that hat madness that is not a run-of-the-mill, frequently-seen design.  More on the way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..  . .. ..