BACK IN TIME AGAIN – 60 OR 70 YEARS. A COTTON HOME-SEWN TRUE VINTAGE FROCK – 1940’S/1950’S

IMG_1239An unusual dark plaid, but a shirtwaist style and definitely for warmish weather.  Notice the second layer of skirt, with a little ruffle at the top.  I wonder if the fabric she used was sold from a narrow bolt, so she had to piece the skirt for that reason???

It’s so much fun to try and unravel the mysteries that older garments, especially, can pose.  Unlike dresses made later, that usually buttoned lower down to make them easy to get into, these earlier ones often button only to the waist.  That’s why those side zippers were so necessary.

It also allowed the waist to be kept really tiny, rather than gathered in by the belt – just barely large enough to get shoulders through, with the help of that zipper opening.  Ahh, fashion . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

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MYSTERY 2-PIECE SKIRT SUIT FROM AUSTRALIA

IMG_1057     This surprise find from October, 2014 looks a whole lot better on Stella than when I photographed it on a bed in the condo!  I simply cannot date it accurately, though it is true vintage.

Custom-tailored, the padded shoulders and bias-cut skirt panels are a Forties thing, while the bonded knit fabric looks more like Fifties or Sixties (maybe even Seventies) and the buttons are uncertain but the zipper is older.  Could it be Eighties Does Forties using some older notions?

Anyway, it’s a cute little casual suit and will be a LOT of fun to accessorize   It can be frustrating to be stumped, but you know I love a mystery . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

MID – CENTURY ART METAL COSTUME JEWELRY, AND A CUTE 1950’S DRESS

Custom-tailored in the 1950’s of heavy cotton, with ric-rac trim and a back metal zipper. Works perfectly right now with a cute white blouse or even a turtleneck top underneath.

Very cute with distinctive costume jewelry from the 1940’s and 1950’s – copper,brass or nickel enameled in bright colors or sculpted in interesting shapes.  These are some of the most fun to wear and are rare finds!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

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SUPER – FUN LATE SIXTIES DRESS FIND – FROM AUSTRALIA

IMG_1054IMG_1055 Here’s a better look at my street – market find.  When I saw the print and colors on this, I just HAD to have it!  When I touched the slinkiest of slinky nylon/poly/whatever fabric, I was over the moon!

Just a simple shirt style, with an elongated collar, but the open sleeves are a really fun touch.  It will be a very cool Spring statement dress – hard not to get noticed coming down the street in this.

And, so much fun to meet the daughter of the woman who had made it.  Getting family stories along with the great clothing is the best!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

SHEER 1950’S PARTY DRESS AND SILK SLIP

IMG_1149IMG_1147IMG_1150IMG_1148These pieces were found on opposite sides of the world, several years apart, but they work here.  Mid-century sheer dresses require beautiful, but pretty plain, lingerie slips of the right length to carry them off properly.

From Canada, the lovely peach-colored silk slip can double as a dress.  Bias cut and the slinky, sexy fit points to the 1930’s as it’s era.  Pretty embroidery makes it really special and it has little hardware which make the shoulder straps adjustable..

The sheer party dress, which I found in Australia a few years ago, was probably custom-tailored.  Dropped waist and tea length.  See the photo showing metallic piping that is sewn around each sleeve and the front of the neckline, with a cowl in back. The fabric also has metallic flower and leaf decoration stamped on.  So fabulous to find pieces like this in near-perfect condition!

Picky work to construct this dress, and I’m so astounded by the skill of seamstresses back in the day.  Yes, it was a lot of work, but how fun it would be to have something exactly as you wanted with personalized fit!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

TRUE VINTAGE CUSTOM-TAILORED FOR THE MAN IN HER LIFE

IMG_0961 IMG_0962 IMG_0972Yes, you can also make your husband’s, son’s, father’s, boss’s (lets not get carried away) next necktie, etc., etc, etc, . . . . . .

This red shirt was custom-made, but by a western-wear retailer out West, sometime in the ’40’s, ’50’s or maybe the early ’60’s.  Bespoke attire was a common luxury, even here in the U.S.  Of course, it’s been a tradition and beautifully done in Europe for decades (centuries?)

I’ve recently seen some ads for what looks like business and formal clothing that can be ordered custom-made, with one fitting or at-a-distance alterations near the end of the process.  An improvement on ready-to-wear, but not like having it constructed from the first detail by a tailor having that in-person relationship with you and your body, giving you a perfect fit, exact style preference and real-time preview.

And what a nice luxury it was to have that done for you, or to have the leisure time to do it yourself . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

McCALL’S NEEDLEWORK MAGAZINE FEATURE FROM 1956 – MAKE YOUR OWN HATS

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Since, at that time, a hat was a must-add to your outfit almost every day, being able to make your own saved women a lot of money.  At the beginning of every season, women would hustle to up-date their accessories.  Of course, a new hat from a milliner or a dress shop would be the first choice, but those could be pricey, even then.  And, like shoes, a variety of different hats was the best thing!

These DIY styles are so cute.  Like the dresses and sweaters I’ve shown from these vintages magazines, they range from casual to very dressy and can be surprising in how professional they look.

Up through the Fifties, at least, being able to construct and maintain the family’s clothing was an essential part of most housewives’ duties, along with cooking and cleaning. Although I’m told it could be fun, it was not a hobby . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM