MORE 1930’S – 1940’S SLEEVES FROM A DAY-DRESS

Puffed, very girly sleeves on a plain, black crepe dress that was a very common part of most women’s wardrobes.  Almost everyone had a black crepe dress – often more than one and not just for evening wear.  Crepe was such a frequently-used fabric that made even ho-hum garments drape beautifully and look fabulous!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

1940’S SLEEVE TREATMENTS – WHAT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN, AND AGAIN, AND AGAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . .

This post was inspired by the fabulous Theodora Brack and her post of a few weeks ago on the blog, Paris: People, Places and Bling.  Shirt sleeve styles are, again. doing some very interesting things with pleats, gathers and puffs.  Here are a few from my  own true vintage collection which show how these styles cycle through the decades.

Pictured here are 1930’s and 1940’s blouses excepting, in photos #1 and #3, the right-hand and left-hand examples are retro Forties, which were made in the early 1980’s. Cotton, silk, rayon and poly.  Kimono, pirate, Western-inspired and prissy designs all had their day in the 1940’s and have wound their way up and down runways every decade or two since then.  Of course, some decades were known for their beautiful craftsmanship, gorgeous fabrics and special tailoring details so these aspects will always be showcased in true vintage garments from those times.

Modern blouses which follow these style trends will not be nearly as beautiful or as well-made but, I love my finds.  Thanks for the opportunity to put them in the spotlight again.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

 

FABULOUS SURPRISE FIND – REEDCRAFT LEATHER PURSE FROM THE 1920’S – 1930’S

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What a rare and wonderful discovery!  In excellent condition – perhaps never used.  Only some minor discolorations from age or storage and almost 100 years old.

These handbags have beautifully finished leather and fun hardware touches.  A tri-color Bakelite clasp ornament and even a little coin purse stashed inside.  When you think that this was at the beginning of the Great Depression with war looming in Europe, it puts a different slant on this pretty product.  The company was formed in 1928, just a year before the stock market crash.

Despite it all, people did find ways to enjoy life in the 1930’s – some of the most fun movies were made during that time, some of the most luxurious and over-the-top fashion plus beautiful Art Deco furniture, architecture and ornamentation.

Pack up your troubles in your old kit bag and smile, smile, smile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

JUST FOUND! A SHIMMY-SHAKE LITTLE BLACK DANCING DRESS FROM THE LATE FIFTIES OR EARLY SIXTIES

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I had one other 1960’s sheath dress with fringe like this several years ago, and it was a surprise.  Looks like a hoochie-coochie 1920’s or ’30’s frock but that kind of fringe is so GREAT for Sixties dancing, too.  I guess some women thought so . . . . . . . . . . .

The interesting thing about this particular one is that the body of the dress is made of a soft fabric that feels like cotton with chenille stripes.  I thought chenille was just for bedspreads, bathrobes and sweaters.  That’s one thing I love about this investigating – you learn something new every day (and get to play dress-up every day, too).

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

THREE OF MY OLDEST TRUE VINTAGE HAWAIIAN GOWNS

THREE OF MY MOST VINTAGE HAWAIIAN GOWNS

From the 1960’s back to, maybe the 1920’s, these three are my oldest vintage examples of Hawaiian gowns.  From the farthest left, to right –

Psychedelic hues and patterns on the far left – not hard to see the late Sixties here.  The center dress is from the 1950’s and is fashioned in the traditional Hawaiian style, with a panel on the back that is almost like a train, without the dragging hem.

On the far right is a mystery dress with a metal side zipper. It has images in the print that are not your standard Hawaiian shirt variety and the fabric is very different –

instead of being the heavy cotton that I’d usually expect, it is a fluid material that I’d guess is rayon. If the label did not indicate that it was made in Hawaii, I’d say it had come from Japan.  The toggle closure at the neck is also something often seen on Chinese and Japanese garments. It’s also got a very 1930’s cut – close to the body.

Hmmm . . . . . . . . . this is REALLY Mata Hari undercover espionage stuff.  I wonder how she wound her way to the place where I discovered her . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

MY MOST QUIRKY, OLDEST EVENING COATS – FROM THE 1930’S & 1940’S

MY MOST QUIRKY, OLDEST EVENING COATS - FROM THE 1930'S & 1940'S

These black crepe coats are so fun and individual – I really love wearing them!  While not being fully antique, they are earlier examples from the ’30’s & ’40’s.  One may be from the early ’50’s . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

On the far left, the characteristic feature of this one are the shoulder tails, which are folded across the front in this picture.  It also has a deep slit in the back hem – almost a long jacket, rather than a coat.

In the center is a rather plain, tailored black crepe coat, but you can see the scalloped hems on the sleeves.  Perfectly elegant and discreet.

On the right, a plain, one – button front crepe coat with ivory lining, deep side slits and mink cuffs at the elbows.  Hardly inconspicuous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

IT’S TIME FOR MID-CENTURY COTTON DAY – DRESSES TO COME OUT OF THE CLOSET

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These fun and beautiful frocks are what EVERYBODY was wearing as everyday-wear between about 1935 and 1965.  The cottons are sturdy but wash and wear to a fabulous softness.  The colors are bright and the motif’s go from traditional floral or medallion prints (like the one here) to atomic geometrics and cartoon novelty images.

I absolutely cannot get enough of these!  The typical fit and flare styling is very forgiving, allowing  me a reasonable fit across about 3 sizes.  A belt can work wonders with almost any garment.  If shoulder pads are appropriate to the era, that makes a big difference, too.

With the exception of the Sixties shift style, this basic shirt-waist design is just about the most comfortable, practical and versatile for day-wear ever; still, it allows for elegance and the irreplaceable look of true vintage fashion.  I’ll keep showing more of these wonderful everyday styles, and whatever turns up.  Stay tuned . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE FUR ACCESSORIES FROM THE ’30’S, ’40’S, ’50’S & ’60’S

TRUE VINTAGE FUR ACCESSORIES FROM THE '30'S, '40'S, '50'S & '60'S

It’s still not too late to glam it up with fabulous fur accessories, especially during the variable March weather . . . . . . . our mothers and grandmothers had to be prepared to look chic no matter what!

Marlene and Celia have been waiting for another chance to get into the picture.  Here you see them modeling a variety of mink accessories, with the exception of the black muff far left, which I believe is of rabbit fur and has a small zipper compartment and the black hat, which is curly lamb.

Whole skinned animals, with heads, feet and tails (and little glass eyes) were popular as stoles in the 1930’s & 1940’s, maybe the ’20’s, too.  Big “Eeew!” factor for a lot of people now.  I’ve already covered the fur issue so, if you love real furs (and animals) stick to 1960’s and before.

There’s a dark brown mink scarf that closes with a big mink-covered button (very elegant) and a blonde mink “dickie” to wear at the neckline under your coat.

The hats are probably the most visible accessory when you’re first seen – these are super-flattering but also will be warm. So, when you’re forced to take to the sidewalks, just remember —- to be well-dressed at all times is a gift to yourself and everyone who sees you.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG: MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

TRUE VINTAGE TAP PANTS FROM THE 1920’s, 1930’S, 1940’S AND ?! 1970’S

TRUE VINTAGE TAP PANTS FROM THE 1920's, 1930'S, 1940'S AND ?! 1970'S

To wear with a pretty brassiere or camisole, these were the underpants of the ’20’s, ’30’s and ’40’s.  In the 1970’s they also came back for a while, though not as sumptuous or luxurious as the originals.

Clockwise, 12, 3 and 6 o’clock are the older ones, made of silk with hand-done embroidery and lace.  They also close with buttons on the left side.  At 9 o’clock, the newer pair from the ’70’s is of nylon and has nice lace, with an elastic waistband.  It also has a matching camisole.

Look at those luscious colors!  And, the silk is so smooth and comfy.  In most cases, a garter belt and hose would also be worn with these, since women were usually wearing skirts or dresses, and those were often loose-fitting.  Nothing there to cramp your Charleston, Lindy or Jitterbug style.

You know what I’d rather wear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

PRETTY IN PINK: 1930’S – 1940’S – 1950’S NIGHTWEAR FOR THE VINTAGE BOUDOIR

PRETTY IN PINK:  1930'S - 1940'S - 1950'S NIGHTWEAR FOR THE VINTAGE BOUDOIR

Now we’re talkin’!  Setting the mood here for Cupid’s Day.  Some are relatively demure, but all are beautiful nylon and silk sleepwear from a time when those things were really special.

Whether a young girl heading off to college, or a young woman on her honeymoon, one (or two) of these would surely be stowed in her luggage.

Madge likes that cute robe with the double button closure at the waist.  It would work well over the little short-sleeved gown – perfect for dorm room dreams. As for the silk number in the center, well, it is Valentine’s Day so forget the robe . . . . . . . … . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG;  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM