TRUE VINTAGE SHEER SHIRT-DRESS FOR SPRING FROM THE 1950s

TRUE VINTAGE SHEER SHIRT-DRESS FOR SPRING FROM THE 1950s

In the 1950s, this style of shirt-dress in a very sheer printed material was popular.  I have found several of them here and there.  Although the photo doesn’t do it justice, it’s one of my favorites.  The fabric drapes really well and is very flattering.  Bits of pink in the print help it to go with my skin-tone.

Usually, dresses of this type were belted and, of course, would be worn over a slip. Imagine this one with a lovely true vintage nylon slip underneath (but not a fussy slip). and a covered buckle belt or tie belt. . . . . . . . . . .your skirt swaying in the breeze as you walk down main street on your shopping errands for the day.  A pretty little ’50s bag and peep-toe sling-back sandals might be nice.  Or, you can mix it up.  I love a full-on vintage look, especially with dresses, but mixing decades is also fun.

Vintage accessories with modern clothing really works for me sometimes. I find the mixing easy with casual looks. The great thing about many true vintage items is that their styles are very classic and elegant. Therefore, if you do go 100% true vintage in an outfit that is very elegant, it won’t look overdone or too much like a movie set. Be careful not to over-do things like jewelry or hat and gloves unless you want to aim for the kitchie look.  That’s fun, too.  And, to me, fun is what it’s all about.

I love the elements of history, mystery, style and aesthetics and recycling – but it’s all fun to me!  Everyone loves a treasure hunt, because you just never know . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

TRUE VINTAGE 1970’S ELEGANT DINNER-DANCE-DATE DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE 1970S ELEGANT DINNER-DANCE-DATE DRESS

It seems to me that nothing from the 1970’s could be as wonderful as a beautifully made dress from the 1920’s, 1930’s, 1940’s or 1950’s, but I still like some of the ones made during the Seventies.  These crystal pleats in the skirt started in the 1940’s, I think, and are always great.

For a more relaxed time while you still want to look well-dressed, elegant but comfortable this is a good choice.  It’s still cool enough in many parts of the world to wear this dress.  It would be very nice for a dinner date and, like some others I’ve shown, excellent for dancing because of the ease of movement.

Although it’s made of the ever-present 1970’s polyester, the fabric is lightweight and hangs well.  I love the pleats in the skirt for that reason.  That’s one nice thing about polyester, no matter what decade it’s from – it holds its shape and travels really well.

The colors in this dress are fresh for Spring, but would carry you through any time of year if the weather permits.  Very versatile and also figure – enhancing because of the cut.  It’s another of those vintage styles which intrigues by draping over and moving with your shape, but not too much.  Bateau necklines are always a favorite of mine, too.

With a skinny belt and very simple jewelry, this one is a winner and worth the investment.  I always like getting big dividends from small investments. . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

TRUE VINTAGE RAYON DAY DRESS FROM THE LATE 1930s TO EARLY 1940s

TRUE VINTAGE RAYON DAY DRESS FROM THE LATE 1930s TO EARLY 1940s

Here’s another lovely shirtwaist dress for a Spring day, this one in rayon.  It could have been custom made or ready-made – no tags or tell-tale details to help me be sure.  In most cases, dating true vintage clothing is not an exact science, but with knowledge and experience can be pretty close. This frock makes me think of something Bonnie, of Bonnie & Clyde, might have worn.

Due to its age and previous history of wear, it did require a bit of rehab despite the wonderful condition.  Buttons had to be replaced and, as I mentioned in a previous post, a “new” belt had to be constructed as the original was missing.  I keep a store of vintage buttons for cases just like as this.  Also, I keep vintage belts that are worn in order that they can be re-covered.  That’s exactly what I did here – as there was lots of extra fabric in the hem allowance, I was able to harvest enough to re-cover a belt without messing up the original hem length.  You can see that the color of the fabric in the belt is slightly darker than that of the dress, but I don’t mind.  Sometimes that is done on purpose to add extra interest.  Also, since covered belts usually would not be laundered along with a dress (since their insides are like cardboard), the dress fabric might fade a bit more over time.  So, this un-faded piece of fabric from the interior of the hem (never exposed to sun) ends up being a perfect authentic-looking touch!!

To me, nothing says “Spring” more than these pastel printed dresses in breezy styles.  The lingerie that must go with them, because of their sheerness, just adds to the package.

When I find one of these I really jump for joy! It’s just one thrill after another because, you just never know .. . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

A PRETTY BELTED SHIRTWAIST DRESS FROM THE 1950’S

A PRETTY BELTED SHIRTWAIST DRESS FROM THE 1950'S     This conservative little style is very sweet, no?

It is made of a pure cotton material, I would guess, and was probably custom tailored (from looking at the details).  I have at least one more dress which has cross-stitch embroidery on it but, to tell the truth, many true vintage dresses that were commercially made have lovely detail, too. And, of course, it could have been added later by the owner.

I also really love skinny, fabric-covered belts on dresses – a common feature on dresses made at this time. As I’ve mentioned before, I’ll sometimes shorten an extra-long hem and make a covered belt from the extra fabric when an original belt is missing.

These dresses look nice with a cardigan sweater or a shawl, so they can go from Spring into Fall with ease. They were standard daytime wear for just about everybody back in the day. It’s so great to see how the classic styles remain elegant and wearable for decades.

And, because fabrics and construction were so well done and women took good care of their clothing, I continue to find them. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

TRUE VINTAGE 1950s WIGGLE DRESS BY A WELL-KNOWN MID-CENTURY DESIGNER OF CALIFORNIA

TRUE VINTAGE 1950s WIGGLE DRESS BY EVE LE COQ OF CALIFORNIA FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY

Here’s a line-up of wool dresses from the 1960s and 1950s, lightweight and classic enough to wear in some parts of the world in three seasons of the year.  Although I’m highlighting the second from the left, I’ll describe them all to start.

On the far left, a mid-weight jumper from the mid – late 1960s in a brown tweed.  Can’t recall the maker, but made in the U.S.  The bodice is lined and it is intended to be worn as a sleeveless dress or with a blouse underneath – your choice.  In the cold weather I’d probably want the blouse, but some people like their arms bare even in winter and that was a popular style then.  A cardigan sweater over would work, too.  Although it didn’t come with its own little jacket, sometimes sleeveless dresses did.  Great style for school or office.

Third in line is a straight, belted shift in heather blue by Pendleton.  They’ve been making quality wool clothing for decades and it is always classic.  This one from the late ’60s can also be worn alone or will a blouse or turtleneck.  Also perfect for school or work.  Some women would put this on as a day dress for shopping, meetings, etc.

On the far right is a wiggle sheath from the late ’50s.  Also a U.S. maker.  It is lined around the upper bodice and neck and is designed to be worn sleeveless.  It’s a simple, un-decorated design but would look best in the evening or at an after-work party or dinner.  It could have gone to work if dressed down a bit with a sweater or jacket.

Now for our star of the day – Are you looking for ideas about what to wear on St. Paddy’s Day?  Look no further.  This is a smart, figure-enhancing dress that is demure enough for any setting and also sophisticated enough for any.  It all depends on your accessories. In a lovely kelly/emerald green, it’s also a nice transition color into Spring.  Eve Le Coq of California produced lovely dresses – very chic.

It’s not been unusual for me to encounter these kinds of wool frocks at various places in my searches.  If you find yourself in a store, they are often marked down at this time of year.  Don’t let wool fabric discourage you – as long as you’ve got a breathable (well-ventilated) storage bag for moth season and a clothing brush, it’s easy to care for and can be dry-cleaned at home if there are no serious stains.  Very versatile, very vintage and worth the investment.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

PERFECT TRUE VINTAGE 1950’S PARTY DRESS IN ICY MINT GREEN

PERFECT TRUE VINTAGE 1950s  PARTY DRESS FOR ST. PATRICK'S DAY

Looking for a St. Paddy’s frock?   Here we go again – a lovely pouf dress from the 1950s of acetate rayon and chiffon, in minty sherbet green this time.   I love this for Spring, with the sheer 3/4 sleeves and the jewel neckline.  Look at that deep hem in the overskirt!

This is a below-the-knee formal dress that could also be worn to a Prom, dinner, dance or any formal event that doesn’t require a full-length skirt.  ‘It would also be lovely worn in a wedding by attendants or by a bride who didn’t want to wear the typical white or ivory. Many ’50’s brides wore gowns of this length.

The sheer chiffon covers the rayon dress underneath and there is a sewn-in crinoline of netting.  I don’t believe that there are any tags remaining but I suspect that it was commercially-made.  However, it’s not always certain – many seamstresses in business or at home were VERY skilled.

Finding dresses like this is always magical.  Where was it first worn?  Who kept it for decades and why was it so special?  You just never know . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BOOK:  HOW TO FIND THE BEST IN VINTAGE FASHION – AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

TRUE VINTAGE 1960S – ’70s GREEN FLORAL PRINT HAWAIIAN DRESS

TRUE VINTAGE 1960S - '70s GREEN FLORAL PRINT HAWAIIAN DRESS

What’s special about this find?  Aside from being about 40 years old, it is made in Hawaii – which used to mean beautiful, quality cottons and rayons and lovely workmanship.  This one doesn’t disappoint.  It has a back zipper with a small bow trim there. The neckline has piping around it and the heavy cotton material drapes nicely.  As usual, the print and color saturation are wonderful in these fabrics.

A straight, mu-mu style is very versatile and flattering to most figures.

Are you planning to attend or host some casual event this weekend, or just a laid-back day at home?  In keeping with the green spirit of this St. Patrick’s holiday, I suggest a dress like this one.  As long as it’s warm enough where you are, a dress like this can be worn almost anywhere, to do anything.  It’s even possible to dress it up with jewelry, shoes and bag.

Vintage made in Hawaii has always been so distinctive – it’s a special look all its own.  It does tend to follow style trends a bit, but some of the classic looks don’t change. I’ll be showing others that are older, too.  These have been so popular over the years that they sometimes turn up in my searches and I’m always thrilled to find them.  Just putting one on takes me to an exotic time in my mind and then, well you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

BEAUTIFUL EMERALD GREEN TRUE VINTAGE 1960’S-1970’S GOWN BY A NEW YORK DESIGNER

BEAUTIFUL EMERALD GREEN GOWN BY A NEW YORK DESIGNER

Just right for summer “formal-ish” events and dances, and what could be better for St. Patrick’s Day?  This one is pretty dressy, but I could just as easily see someone wearing it as a hostess ensemble for an elegant at-home event.  It’s very well made and fully lined, but has a casual feel about it, too.  Must be the color.

The tag says Tee-ca New York. Never heard of them, but the dress is lovely in a heavy knit with beads embellishing the neckline. That color was very popular in the late ’60’s, too.  It’s kind of MOD, James Bond and all of that.

Like yesterday when I discovered the 1940’s dresses (and they all fit me!), it’s just such a thrill to run across an item that immediately transports you to another time and place.  That’s half the fun of it all – where you’ll be “going” tomorrow.  You just never know . . . . . . . . . .

Morgana Martin, the Magicvintagespy
Blog: Magicvintagespy.com

1940’S RAYON DAY DRESS – ANOTHER FABULOUS FROCK DISCOVERED!!

Just about my favorite dress era – WWII to Post-war – and in my size.  I was SO thrilled to uncover this wonderful rayon frock in a great green & white on black ferny print.  Very well-made and in fantastic condition.  Love those mid-century women who looked after their clothing so well.  If I’m looking for some green to wear on the 17th of March, this one has enough green to get me in the door.

So iconic and perfect.  Drapey rayon in a wonderful art print.  It “made” the start of my day.  Even though I always expect to find treasure, you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

True Vintage Early 1960s Dressy Coat Over Your St. Patrick’s Day Frock

True Vintage Early 1960s Evening Coat
I showed this coat a few weeks ago, but what time could be more appropriate for a re-run . . . . . .

Imagine yourself in this, over a gorgeous green dress, on your way to a swanky cocktail party or the church dance.  This beauty is by Lilli Rubin, in emerald rayon blend, lined in turquoise blue!  The collar, neckline bow and elbow-length sleeves are hallmark features of that era, as well as the color.  The fabric is a jacquard with flowers embroidered all over.
What a great surprise it was to find this!!  It starts up all kinds of fantasies about elegant dinners, evenings at the theater . . . . . you just never know . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM