THE FIRST OF TWO FABULOUS MID-CENTURY FINDS – NEW LOOK CUSTOM-TAILORED BALL GOWN

This gown is hand-tailored with extreme attention to detail.  It would be worn with a crinoline for a full, bell-shape.  Because of the styling, I would guess that it was made in the early 1950’s but, possibly, as early as the late 1940’s.  A special occasion dress, of course, and there’s hardly any evidence of wear.  Maybe it was even made for a Prom or Homecoming dance back in the day.

Women were so happy to dress in longer skirts, sumptuous fabrics and new styles after the austerity of the war years.

I’ll be showing a sister gown tomorrow – very similar style and probably made a few years earlier.  What fabulous discoveries!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

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MADE IN JAPAN – LOOK AT THIS FAB COTTON KIMONO!

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Although the phrase “made in Japan” used to connote (in Western countries) some cheap trinket back in the WWI, WWII and Post-war days before their technological revolution, Japan is also the country that is known for gorgeous kimonos and traditional garments of the most elaborate embroidered silk.

Another unusual and  surprising find.  I’m not sure exactly how to date this 100% cotton robe, but it’s beautiful and well-styled in it’s elegant simplicity.  The fan motifs are very wonderful and I love the colors (as does Stella – with that auburn hair it’s dynamite on her!).

Definitely a keeper.  More to come . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

1940’S SLEEVE TREATMENTS – WHAT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN, AND AGAIN, AND AGAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . .

This post was inspired by the fabulous Theodora Brack and her post of a few weeks ago on the blog, Paris: People, Places and Bling.  Shirt sleeve styles are, again. doing some very interesting things with pleats, gathers and puffs.  Here are a few from my  own true vintage collection which show how these styles cycle through the decades.

Pictured here are 1930’s and 1940’s blouses excepting, in photos #1 and #3, the right-hand and left-hand examples are retro Forties, which were made in the early 1980’s. Cotton, silk, rayon and poly.  Kimono, pirate, Western-inspired and prissy designs all had their day in the 1940’s and have wound their way up and down runways every decade or two since then.  Of course, some decades were known for their beautiful craftsmanship, gorgeous fabrics and special tailoring details so these aspects will always be showcased in true vintage garments from those times.

Modern blouses which follow these style trends will not be nearly as beautiful or as well-made but, I love my finds.  Thanks for the opportunity to put them in the spotlight again.

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

 

 

JUST FOUND – GREAT TRUE VINTAGE EIGHTIES DOES FORTIES SEPARATES!

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I love these!!  Beautifully-made 1980’s retro ’40’s separates that fit me really well.  I’ll swap out the buttons on the blouse for true vintage ones, but otherwise it’s all perfect.

The neatest thing about the skirt is not the flattering gored swing style (though that’s GREAT) – it’s the fabric.  This skirt is made of wool gabardine twill.  That’s a fabric that was super-popular during the  wartime 1940’s and is rarely seen today.

I love finding well-tailored garments that are cut and constructed beautifully from quality materials – much rarer today than back in the day, so I’m thrilled to discovery these!

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

LATEST DISCOVERY: MID-CENTURY LADIES BLOUSE – SO RARE!

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I just LOVE classic mid-century blouses with roll-up sleeves and wing collars!  It’s so unusual to find one in good condition.  This one even has pretty sculpted buttons with a star in the center.  Although it’s barely visible in the photo, there’s even a line of fine embroidery in a contrasting green on the seams in the front placket.

The fabric is also do die for – not sure whether it’s a cotton or rayon because the hand is very smooth.  This shirt is very finely tailored, with all kinds of extra-quality touches on a simple, everyday garment.  Well, that’s just how it goes with true vintage clothing – there’s nothing better.

Almost missed it – but when you’ve got the eye for the subtleties, things turn up.  What will be next? –  you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG;  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

FABULOUS 1950’S CLASSIC MEN’S SMOKING ROBE – RARE, RARE, RARE!!!

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A bit rumpled, but perfect!  This was a higher-end men’s garment and an indispensable wardrobe item for men in the mid-century.  A well-made bathrobe for elegant at-home time was worn by many men every day.

Lovely cotton, rayon and silk were commonly-used fabrics in mid-century and, like their street-wear brothers, these lounge-wear garments were well-tailored and elegant.  I’m SO thrilled to uncover another one of these, which is a rare find (my favorite!)

I encounter a lot of rare finds, but they’re all different, so the surprises never stop!  Stay tuned – you just never know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM

ANOTHER ‘NEW’ FIND – A 1960’S LACE OVERLAY JUNIORS PARTY DRESS

Isn’t this pretty?  It’s another iconic early to mid-Sixties style that I’ve seen before – a party/dance/special occasion frock made for junior sizes.  Empire styling and cute bows.  These are almost always manufactured by some smaller maker – sometimes they have a department store name.

That’s how some of the best middle-priced dresses were marketed – sold in small stores around the country or well-known department stores.  More popularly-priced clothing was available through the Sears, Montgomery Ward and Penney’s stores and catalogs – catalog shopping was huge.

I think it’s so cool that our grandmothers could buy a moderately-priced dress like this and find hand-stitched details inside.  That disappeared not long after this one was made . . . . . . . . . . .

MORGANA MARTIN, THE MAGICVINTAGESPY

BLOG:  MAGICVINTAGESPY.COM